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GO Brooklyn archive

GO Brooklyn: The Brooklyn Paper#8217;s essential guide to the Borough of Kings

Saturday, July 24, 2004

FRATS PARTY

They may have X-ray vision, super strength and the ability to cling to walls, but even superheroes need a hand raising funds. Comment.

DANCING THE SAMBA

In September, chef Mark Dabundo, a long-time Bay Ridge resident, opened Samba, a Nuevo Latino restaurant, on Third Avenue. While Nuevo Latino cuisine - a blend of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, Ecuadorian and Latin American cooking - started in the 1990s and spread to several New York neighborhoods, restaurants serving this vibrant fare in Bay Ridge are as exotic as fondue places were to Greenwich Village in the early ’60s. Comment.

CASH ’N’ CARRY

Williamsburg writer-director Joshua Marston is opening a lot of eyes these days to the softer side of drug smuggling. Comment.

SUMMER ’LOVE’

The cultural life of Brooklyn has never been brighter. This summer, a new event has joined the traditional festivals - Outside Art, a four-week, outdoor, performing arts series featuring modern and Shakespearean theater and dance performances by emerging New York City-based artists, held at BAM Park in Fort Greene. Comment.

BROOKLYN GOES TO HELL

While fiery furnaces, menacing torture devices and the prospect of eternal damnation may not seem as appealing as, say, heaven, to most of us, for one troupe of Williamsburg artists and performers, hell is not such a dreadful place. Comment.

FRATS PARTY

As bright red and yellow balloons hovered outside at the grand opening of Frats Ices in Park Slope on July 9, so too did Brooklynites, young and old, trying to get a peek at the goods. Comment.

IT’S ALIVE!

"He’s just resting. Waiting for a new life to come." Comment.

TACOS FOR ART

Wherever they open a new store, the folks behind Chipotle Mexican Grill do something special. Comment.

BLOOM ONSTAGE

A special musician will take the stage at Bargemusic this weekend. Comment.

DOESN’T ADD UP

Most of us today would be lost without our cell phones, laptops and Palm Pilots. But back in 1923, when playwright Elmer Rice wrote "The Adding Machine," the machine age was still in its infancy. Nevertheless, Rice seems to have had an excellent idea of what lay in store for humankind. Comment.