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IT’S A SMALL, SMALL WORLD

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On the sixth floor of the Con Edison building at 30 Flatbush Ave. at Fulton Street, there is a unique installation that could easily go unnoticed.

Artist Frank Heynick secured the space to set up a tiny wonderland, with the help of Paul Kerzner, manager of public affairs for Con Ed’s Renaissance Housing Program. Heynick’s "miniature piece of Europe," includes a "German city, a Dutch town and port, a medieval walled town, a Swiss village, mountains, valleys, farms and industrial facilities," said Heynick.

"They’re all linked up by a working railway system, an airport, a canal, harbors, moving subways and trolley, highways, bridges, roads and cable cars," the Midwood resident explained. "There’s even a rotating Ferris wheel." The total area of this European extravaganza is about 17 feet by 7 feet, according to Heynick.

The display can be viewed free of charge - but by appointment only - on Wednesdays, from 3 pm to 6 pm. To make an appointment, call (718) 375-9101 or (718) 802-5078.

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