Teacher killed by truck

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like The Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Brooklyn’s legal establishment mourned a beloved Brooklyn Law School professor who was run down by a garbage truck while crossing Montague Street on Wednesday morning.

Sara Robbins, 54, was at Montague and Henry streets shortly after 6 am when a private garbage truck hit her.

Robbins was a well-known law librarian and professor at Brooklyn Law. She joined the faculty in 1985 after holding librarian positions at Yale Law School and Cardozo School of Law.

“Her thoughtful guidance, generosity of spirit and kindness will be greatly missed,” Brooklyn Law said in a statement posted on the school’s Web site.

City Councilman David Yassky (D–Brooklyn Heights) knew Robbins from his days teaching at the Brooklyn Heights–based legal institution.

“She was as sweet a person as you could possibly know,” he said in a muted voice.

Since 1987, Robbins had been a Visiting Professor at Pratt Institute Graduate School of Information and Library Science, and she frequently lectured on copyright issues and law library administration.

Robbins was pronounced dead at the gruesome scene. She was buried on Thursday in her native Ohio.

The driver of the truck, which is registered to I.E.S.I., a private carting company based in the Bronx, was not arrested.

An investigation into whether he was criminally negligent is ongoing, police said. An I.E.S.I spokeswoman had no comment.

Area residents were not surprised by the fatality. Henry Street has long been a conduit for sanitation trucks heading towards Atlantic Avenue. The trucks often leave slicks of oily garbage that pedestrians and bicyclists slip on, residents said.

And according to Transportation Alternatives, Henry Street is one of the three most dangerous stretches in Brooklyn Heights. Since 1995, six pedestrians have been hit — though not all fatally — at the intersection of Henry and Montague.

Robbins was the seventh.

Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like The Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Reader Feedback

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

This week’s featured advertisers

See all ads