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Bookworm beaten at main branch

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The story was filled with violence, but at least it came to a satisfying conclusion.

Police arrested the woman who brutally beat and slashed an employee at the Brooklyn Public Library’s main branch on March 8.

The 53-year-old worker was on duty at the Grand Army Plaza location around 12:30 pm when the woman attacked — without any warning or apparent reason. The brute bashed her on the head with a metal box and the blade-like edge sliced open the left side of the victim’s face.

The attack earned the library worker a trip to New York Methodist Hospital, on Seventh Avenue in Park Slope. Police arrested the 22-year-old attacker on felony assault charges.

Mystery attack

Maybe it was all the sugar and caffeine.

Whatever the reason, a thug brutally beat a 25-year-man inside a donut shop on Fifth Avenue on March 3, police said.

The brute jumped the victim, a Harlem resident, inside the coffee and pastry franchise at Ninth Street moments before 4 am. He punched him several times in the face, leaving him with a broken nose and eye socket.

The victim was treated to a trip to Kings County Hospital while police searched for the attacker, a 5-foot-11, 220-pound white man, dressed in blue jeans and a black tank top.

Cleaned out

The problem wasn’t that the maid went above and beyond the call of duty. But while she dusted and swept, a burglar paid a visit to the Fourth Street home, police said.

The 63-year-old cleaning woman arrived for work around 11:30 am on March 7, police said. It never occurred to her to check the locks on the back doors before she went upstairs and began her duties.

But when she came down again, at around 2 pm, the back door was open and footprints led from the door into the living room. The room was also ransacked and $57 was missing, according to the homeowner, a 47-year-old woman.

Beer bust

How much is your job worth?

One victim had to mull that over when he was forced to chase after a thief who stole two cellphones from a beer company truck — and buy one of them back from the robber for $50 police said.

The 35-year-old victim was making his rounds at 11:30 am on March 2, when he left his truck parked on Third Avenue, near Warren Street. The vehicle was not locked and, when he emerged from a store, he saw a man in torn, dirty clothes dash from the truck.

The worker gave chase and caught up with the thief. But the man wouldn’t return either cellphone until he had $50 instead.

The victim paid out the money — for his own phone — but didn’t have the cash (or the desire, frankly) to buy back the company phone.

Cell snatch

A youngster lost his cellphone to a thief who accosted him on Prospect Place on March 5, police said.

The 11-year-old victim was on his way home from school around 3:30 pm when he was robbed, between Fifth and Sixth avenues. A 6-foot-1 black man, weighing 140 pounds and wearing a skullcap, demanded he turn over the phone. The boy did so, and the thief walked off with his property.

Petty crime 101

Call it the school of vandalism and minor theft.

That was the lesson learned at a parochial school near Union Street and at Eighth Avenue last week. Sometime between 7:45 pm on March 5 and 7:30 am the following day, a burglar sneaked into the facility, ripped two motion-detectors off the wall and stole a safe, valued at $50, a stack of bills and receipts and $15 in singles.

Hospital heist

It may offer fine medical care, but apparently it isn’t safe from thieves.

An employee at a Seventh Avenue hospital learned that the hard way on March 7, according to police. The woman left her bag under her desk on the third floor of the facility, at Sixth Street, at 8 am. When she went to reach for the bag at quitting time, around 4 pm, the purse was gone.

The contents included various charge cards, her driver’s license, a school ID, a cellphone and $140.

Bodega bust

Someone swiped $520 from a grocery store on Fourth Avenue and Union Street, police said.

Thieves clipped the locks and stole $100 from the register and another $420 from a lockbox between 1 am and 6 am on March 6. When a 32-year-old clerk arrived for work that morning, he found the security gates down, but the locks missing, and the cash register on the floor behind the counter.

Quick hit

A burglar stole two iPods, a wallet with ID, plus makeup and clothes worth over $100 from an SUV parked on Fifth Avenue for less than an hour, police said.

The 19-year-old driver parked the 2004 Nissan Pathfinder near Atlantic Avenue at 8:30 pm on March 4. When the woman, a Staten Island resident, returned at 9 pm, the passenger-side window was smashed and her bag was gone.

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