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A little bit of hipsterdom is on its way to a gritty intersection of Downtown Brooklyn.

The developer of 177 Concord St. has called in architect Karl Fischer — the Montreal designer who gave Williamsburg the trendy Gretsch building known for attracting such bold-name buyers as rapper Busta Rhymes and actress Annabelle Sciorra — to convert the nondescript brick warehouse into industrial-chic, loft-style condos.

The five-story building on the corner of Duffield Street will include 23 market-rate units, including a private penthouse level. There will be a roof deck and, possibly, private cabanas — a recent luxury innovation that is becoming the norm for developers looking to cash in every square inch of space, even on the roof.

The developer paid $6 million for the low-rise-zoned building in 2006, according to city property records. A spokeswoman said this week that the new design would “keep feel and taste of the neighborhood” while adding something that hadn’t yet been seen there: luxury.

“We are offering spacious, New York City-style lofts with an exercise room, a recreation room and a roof deck with great views of the bridges,” said Lizette Martinez, a spokeswoman for the developer.

The warehouse sits in the rapidly changing area between Vinegar Hill and Downtown Brooklyn — which one real-estate broker calls “RAMBO” (Right After the Manhattan Bridge Overpass) and another hopes to dub “Flattery” (after Flatbush Avenue and Tillary Street).

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Reader Feedback

WONDERING says:
177 Concord-
Does anybody know what occupied the warehouse prior to the proposed construction?
June 17, 2008, 9:56 am
Bridge Plaza Association from Bridge Plaza, Brooklyn says:
Most recently, the building was used as the office space for a moving and storage company. Many years ago it was actually a party goods (i.e. crepe paper) factory.

The name of the neighborhood is "Bridge Plaza." The neighborhood has been known as such for decades, before all the new acronyms started to appear in Brooklyn. Bridge Plaza is recognized as “Bridge Plaza” by the NYC Dept. of City Planning and the local community board, Community Board 2, and even by the “Greenest Block in Brooklyn.” “RAMBO” and “Flattery” are just marketing and real estate gimmicks from outsiders - - these terms are not coming from any community meetings. The local organization is the Bridge Plaza Association and can be reached at BridgePlaza@nyc.rr.com.
Sept. 29, 2008, 6:54 am

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