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Leon Freilich, the poet laureate of Park Slope, was so excited by the renovations at the former Lincoln Plaza Hotel that he penned this week’s poetic offering, “Flesh yields to posh”:

The Lincoln Plaza Hotel in Park Slope, in the days of its full flower.
Had 26 small rooms it rented, for $15 an hour.
No reservations or luggage required in that now-pricey canyon,
Though management resolutely insisted each guest bring a companion.
The couples in the Queen Anne manse enjoyed a soundtrack of glory
That emanated from next door’s music conservatory.
Until four doleful years ago when the chandeliers went dark
And well-worn hotsheets were withdrawn from this amusement lark.
Today, five million dollars on, the hotel’s end has come,
As it fatefully morphs into — what else? — a condominium.

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