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A man put up a fight against his would-be mugger, but the thug got away with the man’s iPod on Aug. 26.

The 31-year-old had just left the Clinton–Washington subway station at around 11 pm. A few blocks away, a man on a BMX bike, described as being 5-foot-10 and “very muscular,” approached and asked for change.

When the man said he didn’t have any, the cyclist pointed to the iPod hanging around his neck and asked, “Is that an iPod?” It was apparently a rhetorical question, as the perp punched the man in the chest and grabbed the popular digital music device. He also tried to grab the man’s backpack, but the victim struggled, and the BMX-riding hoodlum took off after grabbing a notebook that had fallen out of the bag.

The man said that an unidentified passerby chased after the perp with a car, but added that he hadn’t gotten the good Samaritan’s information.

Ugly mug

A man was beaten and robbed of his groceries, cash, and passport while walking home on Aug. 31.

The 27-year-old had just finished shopping for food at around 9 pm, and was walking on Lafayette Avenue when he noticed two suspicious pairs of men nearby.

He tried to move past the group at the corner of St. James Place, but one of the men turned around and punched him in the eye, knocking him to the ground.

All four perps began hitting and kicking him in the face and body. They took $200 out of his pockets, and perhaps more importantly, his Egyptian passport.

Sedan stolen

A woman left her car parked on the street for two hours, and that’s how long it took for it to get stolen on Aug. 26.

The victim told cops that she’d parked her 1992 Mercury sedan on the corner of Clermont and Lafayette avenues at around 9 am. When she returned, there was only broken glass.

Carjacked

Even nine-year-old cars are not safe from car theft.

A woman parked her 1998 Honda Accord on St. James Place between Gates and Greene avenues late on Aug. 29. When she came back the next day, the vehicle was gone.

“Come here!”

A man’s early morning stroll on Carlton Avenue ended badly when he walked near the wrong door on Sept. 3.

Around 2 am, the 48-year-old was approaching Myrtle Avenue when he heard a voice call out, “Come here!” from a nearby doorway. He stopped, and a man ran up behind him and put him in a chokehold, dragging him into the lobby of a building. There, the two men, the yeller and the choker, removed $280 from their victim and ran off in different directions.

Locker larceny

A gym customer was dismayed at the end of his workout on Aug. 28 to find his stuff gone from his locker.

The fitness fiend got to the gym, which is on Fulton Street near St. Felix Street, at around 5:30. When he returned to his locker two-and-a-half hours later, his lock was gone, the door was open, and his bag was gone, along with a watch, credit cards, and $120.

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