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Second time around, still no charm

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84th Precinct

Lightning may not strike twice, but crime can — in the same spot, no less.

A gun-toting thief robbed a man on the corner of Schermerhorn and Bond streets on Feb. 26, police said. The 23-year-old victim said it was the second time he was mugged in the same spot.

No details of the first crime were available, since the victim never reported that robbery. But it was deja-vu all over again on Monday at around 9:30 pm when the thief pulled a black handgun and insisted, “Stop and give it up, or I’ll shoot you!”

The experienced victim quickly dug into his pocket and turned over his cash — and the joke was on the robber: The value of the bankroll was a whopping $3.

Big bling burg

In just over 30 minutes, a Willoughby Street jeweler lost nearly 30 grand.

Someone bullied his way into the jewelry shop, near Bridge Street, early on Feb. 21 and escaped with more than 100 diamond, gold and cubic zirconia items, police said.

When the owners of the shop, located a block off the Fulton Mall, arrived for work, they found the security gate halfway open and the front glass door inside smashed.

The missing items included 20 diamond watches, valued at $20,000, 80 “fake bling” earrings, worth $3,000, 17 ladies bracelets and a dozen or so gold pieces.

Nailed

Patrons of one Brooklyn Heights nail salon had plenty to chit-chat about while waiting to dry on Feb. 23.

Police nabbed a 60-year-old man after he became a nuisance at the Henry Street shop and snatched a cellphone from the owner as she dialed 911 to have him ousted. Police Officer Juanita McMillan rolled up to the salon, near Pineapple Street, around 11:40 am, and cuffed the man on grand larceny charges for stealing the phone from the proprietor.

$ and pounds

A new employee of a Court Street diet franchise lightened the company’s assets by nearly $3,000 by failing to deposit money into the company’s bank account, as ordered.

The manager at the national franchise’s local office, which is at Joralemon Street, told cops that between Jan. 3 and Feb. 10, the employee made off with $2,788 in proceeds that were meant to be secured at the bank.

76th Precinct

Homeowner hell

An angry man smashed up $8,000 worth of marble, stole a computer and other items and threatened the life of the proprietor at a kitchen supply store on Union Street, police said.

The furious renovator arrived around 9 pm on Feb. 15, while the marble specialty shop between Columbia and Van Brunt streets was still open, and began to unleash his frustration on a series of marble slabs and kitchen sets.

“I want my money back,” the irate man insisted, adding, “I will kill you — you’ll see!”

The businessman told police the stone-smasher was a former customer and they had a “history” of conflict over a job that the marble store did at his home four months ago. After nearly an hour of extracting vengeance on the countertops, he left, without harming the proprietor.

Fashion victim

A thief stole a costly designer purse from a woman, and blackened her eye in a Feb. 25 robbery on Hoyt Street, police said.

The 30-year-old woman was near Baltic Street when the robber rushed her, shortly after 5 am. He knocked her to the ground, punched her in the right eye, and grabbed her Gucci bag — valued at $900. The mugger disappeared with the bag, plus the car keys, credit cards, insurance papers and a Social Security card.

Teen terrors

A quartet of thugs terrorized one of their 16-year-old classmates, telling him, “You’re a dead man,” before stealing his coveted jacket on Feb. 26, police said.

The Global Studies High School student was walking home after class around 3 pm when the four stopped him on Court Street, near the corner of Degraw Street. Two of the attackers blocked the victim’s path, while the other two wrestled him to the pavement. Threatening the boy with death, they ripped the popular “8-Ball” jacket from his back and bolted.

88th Precinct

Artless criminal

Someone stole thousands of dollars worth of electronics from a woman’s dorm room at the Pratt Institute on Feb. 19.

The 21-year-old victim came home just after midnight to find her iMac computer, iPod and a battery charger missing from her bedroom, police said. The items had all been inside her room on Willoughby Street, near Emerson Place, when she left at 10 pm.

The woman has three roommates and shares a bedroom with another woman — all of whom had access to the valuables, police noted. She had left the bedroom door unlocked.

Fight and flight

The would-be thief who threw a woman to the ground on Clinton Avenue on Feb. 20 narrowly escaped arrest by eluding police in a mad dash through the neighborhood.

The robber rushed the 34-year-old woman as she walked by St. Joseph’s College, near the corner of DeKalb Avenue, around 10:30 pm. He wrestled her to the pavement, insisting, “Shut up and give me your money.”

That’s when an 84th Precinct officer noticed what was going on. Seeing the cop, the thug released the victim and bolted empty-handed down an alley. The mugger dashed through the 90-year-old liberal arts college and onto DeKalb Avenue, with the police officer behind him.

But eventually, the attacker — who could run like a track star despite wearing brown work boots — lost the cop.

Shopper mug

Four men robbed a woman heading to the grocery store on Fort Greene Place on Feb. 20, police said.

The 66-year-old woman was walking between Lafayette Avenue and Hanson Place at around 10:45 am when the thieves rushed her. One of the muggers grabbed her bag, and the gang ran off before she could get a good look at them.

The victim’s purse held credit and bank cards, her identity cards, medication and $55.

Traveling tunes

Two armed thugs stole an iPod from a man leaving a Park Avenue bodega on Feb. 19, police said.

The 32-year-old man stepped out of the store, near Myrtle Avenue, around 11 pm when two strangers rushed him, showed off a small black handgun, and demanded the music player.

Bad hair day

A Brooklyn woman lost nearly $3,000 in hair-styling equipment when thieves broke into her car on Clifton Place on Feb. 25, police said.

The 30-year-old parked the 2000 Volkswagen Cabrio between Classon and Grand avenues around 10 pm. When she returned at 5:30 pm the following day, the front passenger-side widow was busted and the hair-care items — including four pairs of Centrix scissors, worth $1,850; a pair of feather razors; a dryer; various clippers and a curling iron, among others things — were missing.

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