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The Atlantic Yards project may be falling apart on Bruce Ratner, but the developer released some big news for his Metrotech office complex Downtown: the Manhattan law firm of Weil, Gotshal is moving part of its office to Brooklyn.

Forest City Ratner Vice President Mary Anne Gilmartin made the announcement at the Brooklyn Real Estate Roundtable on Tuesday, but said that the 500-lawyer white shoe firm would soon relocate to Metrotech. That turned out to be untrue, as a press release from the company said only some back-office staffers would relocate to 15 Metrotech, which is on the office complex's commons, between Myrtle Avenue and Tech Place.

The news follows a series of bad news for Atlantic Yards, the former 16-skyscraper complex that Ratner says now consists of the public financed basketball arena, plus two smaller buildings around it.

The developer has had better news at Metrotech, which also recently welcomed the staff of El Diario as new tenants.

Today’s news:
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Reader Feedback

Norman Oder says:
Only a fraction of the firm is moving, including Information Systems, Finance and Operations:
http://atlanticyardsreport.blogspot.com/2008/05/is-law-firm-moving-to-ratners-metrotech.html
May 6, 2008, 5:22 pm
Norman Oder says:
Your updated article and podcast fail to point out that only after the initial article and podcast were published, I posted a brief article on my blog and a comment here pointing out the contradiction between your report and the Weil, Gotshal press release.

For the record, the press release from Weil, Gotshal came out an hour before your article was posted. (Search on "Weil, Gotshal" on Google News.)
May 6, 2008, 8:19 pm
Gersh Kuntzman (Brooklyn Paper) says:
The Brooklyn Paper always gives credit where it is due. But in this case, we posted our initial story about the Weil, Gotshal relocation after being given inaccurate information from Forest City Ratner. About an hour later, we received the same press release that Norman Oder cites above and, within minutes, our corrected story and video were online at www.brooklynpaper.com.

As such, there was no reason to credit any other media outlet, including Oder's fine Atlantic Yards Report.

GERSH KUNTZMAN
Editor
May 7, 2008, 12:40 pm
melody from 321oak aveuea says:
do you like brooklyn do you write back and let me no if you like brooklyn ok and good bye for now.
Nov. 24, 2010, 11:17 am

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