Sections

Brooklyn goes fancy

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like The Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Food producers from all over the world flocked to the annual Fancy Food and Confection show at the Javits Center, but Brooklyn companies came out in full force. Most of the Brooklyn companies were there as part of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce’s new “Brooklyn Goes Global” program, which promotes borough-made products.

“The program is having great success because the products are so terrific,” said Rick Russo, a Chamber vice president.

To assess the validity of Russo’s claim, we tasted everything and present this year’s report:

• David Zablocki of Wine Cellar Sorbet, the Greenpoint-based vintage wine ices company, hawked his three new flavors: mimosa, port wine and saki. The mimosa was first rate. For more info, call (718) 383-8308 or visit www.winecellarsorbets.com.

• The three guys who started the Brooklyn Petro hot sauce company let us taste their flagship scorcher, “Exhaust.” It lived up to its name — smoky and hot. The company also makes custom sauces for restaurants. Check them out at www.brooklynpetro.com.

• Moshe Freund was on hand to show off his new “Great King” line of canned tuna fish. Don’t laugh — this is not your normal tinned tuna but full albacore filets. For info, go to www.kingoftheseatuna.com.

• The Vermont Smoke and Cure company was boasting about how its new one-ounce pepperoni stick — which really is perfect for when you crave some pepperoni (and who doesn’t?) but don’t want to buy a huge link — is now available at Stinky Brooklyn on Smith Street. Better than that, of course, is the company’s maple wood smoked bacon (sliced or unsliced!). For info, visit www.vtsmokeandcure.com.

• Self-professed “Brownie Babe,” Mari Tuttle let us try some excellent treats (even though they’re actually baked in Queens). She’s still getting her Park Slope-based company fully up to speed, but you’ll be spotting her desserts in specialty stores soon. For info, visit www.marisny.com.

• Rick Field of Rick’s Picks broke some big news for The Brooklyn Paper: he’s created a special relish for the Shack-Cago dog at Danny Meyers’s Shake Shack in Madison Square Park. That’s big news for a company that started in Brooklyn with just some pickled green beans and cucumbers.

• Blue Apron Foods in Park Slope and the Greene Grape in Fort Greene have started selling organic, fair trade chocolates made by Askinosie, a Missouri-based company. The Mexican nib bar was a standout — as was the company’s policy of paying farmers fair prices for their cocoa beans. The white chocolate — which really isn’t chocolate at all, by the way — was a miss, however. For info, visit www.askinosie.com.

• Wendy Smith of School House Kitchen showed off her award-winning chutney — and proclaimed chutney “the new ketchup”! Let’s hope she’s right because a large share of the company’s profits get funneled into education programs, a la Paul Newman. Check it out at www.schoolhousekitchen.org.

Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like The Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Reader Feedback

lily from lily says:
Lily Lily Lily Lily Lily
July 21, 2008, 7:14 pm

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.