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Cops crack 93rd St drug den

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Police nabbed five suspected drug dealers who turned a peaceful Bay Ridge street into a block of fear and intimidation over the past three years.

Cops busted what they say are two neighboring drug houses on 93rd Street, between Third and Fourth avenues, charging Joseph Terrone, 54, Michael Terrone, 47, Ross Terrone, 45, and Erica Raffone, 31, with running a heroin, crack cocaine and prescription drug ring from the homes. The quartet is facing 25 years to life and is being held without bail.

Police also charged Alan Reilly, 61, with a lower drug selling offense. His bail is set at $50,000.

A sixth suspect remains on the lam.

Residents of the block say they have been terrorized by the dealers and their clientele since the summer of 2005 — and they’ve been calling on the cops to nab them since.

In 2006, an online effort to take down the dealers started on the Internet message board bayridgetalk.com, where Web-savvy Ridgites formed en masse, posting more than 1,000 responses on separate threads about the crack houses.

In October, Jason Miller, whose rear window looked into the backyard of the crack houses, called on Community Board 10 to take action.

“I have personally witnessed suspicious activity,” Miller said at the time. “Not only does this alleged activity pose a direct threat to the safety of community members, but local businesses in our area have had to tolerate acts of vandalism, panhandling and harassment from the people who frequent the location.”

In January, cops finally started investigating the alleged crack houses, but the case was complicated because almost all of the dealing took place behind closed doors.

Kings County District Attorney Charles Hynes said on Wednesday that if authorities known the size of the operation — which carried out “hundreds if not thousands of transactio­ns,” he said — they would have intervened sooner.

“It’s a matter of priority,” Hynes said. “The 68th Precinct was dealing with the complaints as they came in, but I don’t think anybody recognized that it was as expansive as it was.”

No one that is, except for the Ridgites who live nearby.

“I was seeing people who were standing out on the street, trying to get a fix in any way possible — drug dealing, begging, prostituti­on,” Miller said.

“It was just a bad situation.”

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Reader Feedback

Anonymous from Flatbush says:
They finally got these guys. They were doing this for the last 20 years, back when their parents owned the houses. They need to be put away
June 28, 2008, 6:46 pm
PAT from B. Ridge/Ft. Ham. says:
Couldn't have happened sooner.These mutts have been a major problem for years.The middle brother rented a apartment nearby a couple of years ago and it was raided by the Feds & NYPD but apparently no drugs were found. Guess he moved back home because now the family that deals together does time together. Now, if they can get their little playmates.......
July 3, 2008, 2:08 pm
mimi from Bay Ridge says:
It could not have happened soon enough.... Thank Goodness they were put away... And you are right, I hope they get their little playmates because they are still walking the streets.... They can easily be found by Dunkin Donuts... Its just a turn off to walk in Dunkin Donuts and have to deal with them strung out and begging for money.... dunkin Donuts should do something about that... Please we need gloves to open those doors...
July 8, 2008, 9:37 am
Arnold from Bay Ridge says:
So where exactly where the cops and the Brooklyn DA all these many years? Do the cops in the 68 actually pay attention to their surroundings, or do they have blinders on while they cruise the streets in the comfort of their patrol car?

I find it hard to believe that all these years cops have been staked out at that Dunkin Donuts for the 4-12's or 12-8's, not one of 'em sensed something off about that block or what was attracted to it.

The bigger laugh is that the Brooklyn DA himself only lives a few blocks away!

Who's minding the store here, folks?
July 10, 2008, 4:42 pm
James from Bay Ridge says:
So the NYPD response time is now 7 years? Great that they caught them, but shouldn't someone be asking why it took 7 years for an impotent precinct to do anything to stop this?
Aug. 31, 2012, 7:43 am
anyone from same says:
your right but Michael was cool even when he lost everything in fact he was even cooler cause he stopped the drugs pretty much, was always respectful to others at least me for the most I only can say that I miss him and his smile I feel as though I was right for him and he was adorable. Too bad that he was with the wrong crowd I don't think that they are around I don't see them they had there probems and you had to watch your back but the best thing that happened to Michael was when he was broke. He had a great smile and was great company hope he's in a better place JM
June 1, 2015, 8:07 pm

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