Today’s news:

Punch ’n’ rob

The Brooklyn Paper

Four thugs punched a Grand Avenue pedestrian on Jan. 22 and knocked him to the ground, before stealing his iPod and wallet.

The 30-year-old victim had been walking along Grand Avenue, between Gates and Putnam avenues, when one of the thugs demanded, “Give me your money!”

Craftsman hit

A woodworker at a prestigious arts institute in Clinton Hill had his laptop computer stolen after he left it in a classroom on Jan. 18.

The 27-year-old artisan left the fully loaded computer in the classroom in a school building on St. James Place between Clifton Place and Lafayette Avenue. When he returned at 1 pm, the machine, valued at $10,000 thanks to all the software that had been installed on it, was gone.

Bistro break-in

A thief broke into a DeKalb Avenue bistro and stole $3,700 worth of equipment on Jan. 25.

The 48-year-old proprietor closed the restaurant, at Clermont Avenue, at 2 am. When he returned the next morning, he discovered that someone had ransacked the place, stealing three amplifiers, a cash register, a hammer drill, a DeWalt cordless drill, a Pioneer turntable, a case of Shiraz red wine, $1,700, a video iPod, and a half-case of Hennessy cognac.

Laundry cleaned

A 24-hour Putnam Avenue Laundromat was a crime scene twice in two days.

In the first incident, on Jan. 25 at 9:45 am, a 49-year-old woman left her bag in a laundry cart while checking on her clothing. An observant thief seized the opportunity — and a Louis Vuitton backpack that contained a $300 purse and a bunch of keys.

The next day, at 1:45 am, a woman in red walked into the Laundromat and used the bathroom, according to a 47-year-old employee. After she left, a man came in and started yelling at the employee, demanding, “What did you say to my girlfriend?”

He then picked up a clipboard from the counter and hit the employee over the head, leaving a small cut on his forehead.

Hat-shop heist

A thief broke into the rear door of a beloved DeKalb Avenue hat shop and stole nearly $600 worth of equipment from its basement.

The shop owner said he last entered the basement of the store, at Clermont Avenue, on Jan. 19. When he left, he locked the door behind him. When he returned on Jan. 25, the basement door was ajar and damaged. Missing was a Fiberglas ladder, a cable compressor, and a DeWalt reciprocating saw.

Car stolen

A thief stole a Ford from in front of its owner’s Willoughby Avenue home on Jan. 27.

The 56-year-old owner of the 2002 white Econoline van, worth about $6,000 and popular with working men and grunge rockers, said she’d parked it on Willoughby Avenue, between Hall Street and Emerson Place, at 11:40 that morning.

She returned at 1 pm to find it missing. There was no broken glass at the scene to indicate forced entry.

Purse snatch

Two thugs grabbed the bag of a 24-year-old woman as she walked along Hanson Place near South Elliot Place at 10:30 pm on Jan. 26.

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Reader Feedback

Jim from fort greene says:
I would not want to buy a condo or house in any area because of all of the crime you report
Feb. 5, 2008, 11:37 am

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