Sections

Ringling Brothers coming to Coney: sources

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like The Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

The world-famous Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Barnum circus will deliver a shot in the arm to the flagging “People’s Playground” by setting up its big top in Coney Island this summer, two sources told The Brooklyn Paper last Thursday.

The city is brokering a deal for a long, hot summer of lion tamers, clowns and the daring young men on the flying trapeze at a site west of the existing, though battered, amusement area — possibly on a West 22nd Street lot owned by Taconic Investments, the sources said.

Ringling Brothers officials would not confirm the amazing, stupendous news.

“It would be premature to comment on plans for any new markets that are not finalized,” said Steve Payne, a vice president for Feld Entertainment, which produces the venerable three-ring circus.

The arrival of the so-called “Greatest Show on Earth” is likely to brighten a summer forecast for Coney Island that had been looking gloomy. The faded amusement area is down to one theme park, Deno’s Wonder Wheel, after Astroland closed last September.

“Any time that someone wants to bring a circus to Coney Island is a good time, absolutely,’ said Dick Zigun, the founder of the incomparable Coney Island Circus Sideshow.

It is unclear how many of the honky-tonk shops and bars will reopen on the Boardwalk. The area’s main landowner, Thor Equities, is still negotiating rent increases with many of the stores, though they have promised to book attractions for vacant lots this summer, such as a possible flea market on Stillwell Avenue.

“I don’t like Thor’s long-term intentions for Coney Island, but I welcome them to put up tents and bring attractions here for the summer,” Zigun said, who has been critical of Thor’s $2-billion plans for hotels, shopping and rides in Coney Island.

The city has been under increasing pressure to show that there will be life in Coney Island this summer amid criticism that the mayor’s own revitalization plan for the faded amusement zone isn’t moving fast enough.

Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like The Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Reader Feedback

Publius from Bklyn Hgts says:
Watch out for the animal rights protests.
March 19, 2009, 5:47 pm
Eazy D from Sheepshead Bay says:
It looks like Joe Sitt had first crack and blew it -- again. He's a Big Top Pee Wee

http://www.nypost.com/seven/03192009/news/regionalnews/ringling_bros__may_pitch_tent_on_coney_i_160359.htm
March 20, 2009, 2:35 am
PETA from Somewhere says:
—— ringling brothers. you ——ing animal abusers.
March 23, 2009, 7 pm
eman from Brooklyn says:
This is an awareness for people who don't know. The ringling brothers and alike train there animals with over practice that it begins to be to much for the animals. In my opinion, animals shouldn't be put just to "entertain us."
peta.org
March 24, 2009, 5:12 pm

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

This week’s featured advertisers