All scream for ice cream

The Brooklyn Paper
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A crook tried to hold up a Bedford Avenue ice cream shop on Aug. 24, but the store’s coolheaded manager scared him away.

The perp — who was wearing a Chicago Cubs cap during the attempted robbery — entered the Tasti-D-Lite at around 6:30 pm and passed a note to an employee, keeping his other hand under the waistband of his pants to simulate that he was carrying a firearm.

“I have a gun, put the money in a bag,” the letter said.

The worker told the crook she couldn’t open the register without the manager’s key, and she fetched her supervisor. That convinced the would-be robber to flee from the store — located between North Sixth and North Seventh streets — without taking any property.

This stick-up comes just a week after robbers targeted a nearby frozen yogurt eatery and sandwich shop.

Milton mugging

A pair of armed hoodlums held up a Greenpoint man as he walked home from the train on Aug. 30.

The muggers approached the victim at the corner of Milton and Franklin streets at around 6:30 am and one of them pulled out a black handgun.

“Empty your pockets,” one of the robbers demanded.

The victim forked over his camera and cellphone, and the thieves told him to run away or they would shoot him in the back.

60 slugger

Cops nabbed a 21-year-old suspect of attacking a 60-year-old with a bat on Withers Street on Aug. 23.

The slugger struck the victim at around 11:20 pm near the corner of Graham Avenue, hitting him “in neck and leg with an aluminum baseball bat, causing redness and swelling.”

The victim was treated at Wyckoff Hospital.

McCarren Park problems

Thieves were lurking around McCarren Park last week, snatching valuables from at least two goers of the Greenpoint green space. Here are the shocking details:

• A thief heisted a jogger’s wallet while he ran laps at the McCarren Park track on Aug. 24.

The crook grabbed the goods from the 36-year-old’s backpack, which was chained to his bicycle near the corner of Union and Driggs avenues.

The thief snatched the wallet — which contained cash, debit cards, a credit card, and a driver’s license — between 1:30 pm and 2 pm.

• Cops locked up a 41-year-old suspected of snatching a 26-year-old woman’s purse on Aug. 25.

The thief allegedly grabbed the bag, which was sitting on the ground near the corner of Driggs Avenue and Lorimer Street, between 11:30 am and noon.

Got Gershed

Thieves heisted a high-end road bike from its spot near the corner of Driggs Avenue and North Fifth Street — a crime now being referred to in The Brooklyn Paper as “getting Gershed.”

The crooks made off with a Bianchi cycle — valued at $2,740 — some time between Aug. 23 and Aug. 27.

— Ben Muessig

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Reader Feedback

gp from greenpoint says:
Wait, the guy had his wallet with cash, credit cards and license in a backpack that was locked to his bicycle? What an idiot.
Sept. 2, 2009, 9:32 pm

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