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Graveyard shift stinks

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Knife outfits

At least three masked men robbed a Fifth Avenue bodega at knifepoint on Feb 22.

The 22-year-old store employee told cops he was inside of the bodega, between 80th and 81st streets, at around 4:15 am when the suspects, dressed in black masks, gloves and hooded sweatshirts, walked in, pulled out a knife and demanded cash.

The clerk handed over $300 to the men, who fled in black car.

Mean girls

Five teenage girls cornered and robbed two other women of their pocketbooks on 76th Street on Feb. 21.

The two victims, ages 20 and 21, told police they were standing at the corner of Fifth Avenue at around 1:40 am when the gang of girls walked up and began hitting and kicking them.

The suspects grabbed the victims’ purses and ran off with $50, a cellphone and various debit and credit cards.

Lot of trouble

Someone stole more than $1,300 worth of electronics out of a car parked on Fifth Avenue on Feb. 19.

The 30-year-old victim told cops he left his vehicle in a lot between 71st around 72nd streets at around 2:30 am. When he returned just two hours later, he found the passenger–side window smashed, and a navigation system, CD player, phone and camera missing.

Game time

Someone broke into a 62nd Street apartment on Feb. 20, making off with more than $400 in electronics.

The 27-year-old victim told cops he left his home, between 13th and 14th avenues, at around 10 am and returned three hours later to find that his front door had been pried open, and cash and a Sony Playstation were gone.

A quicky

A sneaky thief snatched a woman’s purse from her shopping cart while she browsed a Fourth Avenue store on Feb. 20.

The victim, 47, told police she was inside of the store, between 67th and 68th streets, at around 3 pm. She placed her pocketbook inside of her shopping cart before turning around to look at something on the shelf. When she glanced back, she realized someone had run off with her purse and the $1,000 that was inside.

Snooze button

A man attempted to break into a 62nd Street apartment on Feb. 20, but was scared off when he stumbled upon the victim asleep in his bed.

The 32-year-old resident of the apartment, between 10th and 11th avenues, told police he was napping in his bedroom when a loud noise woke him up around 12:10 pm.

He looked up and saw the suspect, dressed in a black jacket and hood, standing over his dresser. When the suspect noticed the victim was awake, he turned and ran down the stairs empty-handed.

— Emily Lavin

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