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And what’s the deal with this useless bus shelter?

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Somebody at the MTA didn’t get the memo!

In the midst of the transit agency’s implementation of its service reductions last month, workers from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority installed a bus shelter at the southwest corner of Union Street and Prospect Park West.

There’s only one problem: No buses stop there anymore, thanks to service cuts which eliminated both the crosstown B71 and the Prospect Park West portion of the B69.

It’s not just a waste of money — it’s becoming a waste of time for at least one Council office.

“We’re monitoring this situation,” said Councilman Steve Levin (D–Park Slope). “At a time of major budget cuts, we need to make sure that every tax dollar spent is going to worthy projects, and that there is total coordination between city and state agencies. I maintain that the MTA ought to restore the B71 line in its entirety. If we are building the bus shelters, we need the buses to serve them.”

In the absence of bus line restoration, Levin said he would call for the agency to convert the shelter into a covered bike parking lot.

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Reader Feedback

Carl from Midwood says:
At least you don't live in Midwood!

Here the MTA installs bus stops at the bottom of active driveways! The bus blocks the driveway so cars can't get in and out of private driveways. Passengers must board and depart from the bus by stepping into a driveway with no curb to assist them. This is especially dangerous for children, pregnant ladies, and older people. When it's raining, passengers have to wade through water puddling at the bottom of the driveway. In the winter, ice is another safety problem.

There are so many bus stops that block driveways in Midwood and Marine Park and Borough Park! Passengers have complained to the MTA, but get no response. Since lawyers won't sue the city and the council members for Midwood/Marine Park/Borough Park do nothing - just people will continue to struggle with this needless safety issue.

Also, who thinks it's brilliant to place a bus stop directly in front of a synagogue? It's a perfect set-up for people looking to do harm.
July 21, 2010, 10:59 am
Dave from Bed-Stuy says:
Carl, did you ever stop to think that all the private driveways in Midwood are interfering with the bus stops? Children, pregnant ladies and older people would be able to step on the curb and avoid puddles if people did the neighborly thing and replaced their curb cuts with sidewalks.

And placing a bus stop directly in front of a synagogue seems like an excellent way to encourage worshippers to leave their cars at home. Since cars can't park in front of a house of worship, it's a perfect place for the bus.

There -- problems solved!
July 22, 2010, 9:31 pm

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