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Hit-and-run on Flushing Avenue

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A hit-and-run driver critically injured a 2-year-old as he slammed the tot as he was being pushed by his 13-year-old sister near the dangerous corner of Kent and Flushing avenues on Tuesday afternoon.

The tyke remains in critical condition from the 6 pm incident involving the driver of a white van who barreled into the stroller as he made a fast right turn onto Kent Avenue from westbound Flushing Avenue.

Witnesses said that the car ran over the curb, rolled over the boy’s stomach, and did not stop.

The sister was physically unharmed, but the boy was not responsive and unconscious when he was

rushed to Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan.

Community leaders are shocked and angry by the crash.

“The entire community is praying for this child,” said Williamsburg activist Isaac Abraham. “I hope that this driver who left the scene will be apprehended by the police department.”

Police are still investigating and have not released the names of the victims.

The manager of a nearby Kent Avenue gas station said he sees crazy driving all the time.

“I see idiots driving,” said BP station manager Mark Sapozhnikov. “People don’t have any patience and they speed if the traffic light allows.”

A bus driver on the B57 bus, which runs on Flushing Avenue, said he has also witnessed all kinds of reckless driving on his route and was not surprised by the accident.

“It’s amazing it doesn’t happen more often,” he said.

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Reader Feedback

Dave from Park Slope says:
Good thing the NYPD is going to start ticketing cyclists!
Jan. 6, 2011, 7:16 am
Joe R. from Flushing says:
Amazing how there's only 1 comment on this story before mine, compared to over 40 on the cycling crackdown. Guess it's just business as usual-another day, another pedestrian on the sidewalk hit by a motorist. Of course, I'm sure the police will determine the motorist "lost control" as usual.

The station manager though has it exactly right: “People don’t have any patience and they speed if the traffic light allows.”

The traffic lights are exactly the problem. Take them all out so motorists won't be able to drive faster than about 15 or 20 without risking a crash on every corner. A pedestrian or cyclist is ten times less likely to die when struck at 20 mph instead of 40 mph. Of course, the city won't do that even if it'll make things safer because it'll lose a great source of revenue from motorists ( and now from cyclists also ), namely red light tickets.
Jan. 10, 2011, 7:32 am

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