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Tom Chapin’s food for thought

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Grammy Award-winner Tom Chapin has something to say: More veggies, please!

The Brooklyn Food Coalition will kick off national Food Day at PS 58 with a benefit fair and performance by Chapin, who will debut his new children’s album, “Give Peas a Chance,” serving up 14 nutritionally conscious songs, including “Beans Talk” and “Life Grows On.”

“I love the idea that if a kid in the car, listening to the song says, ‘What’s a carnivore?’ it could spark a conversation!” says the eco-minded entertainer, who grew up a ball toss away in Brooklyn Heights, where a playground in Columbia Heights and Middagh Street is named after his late brother, singer Harry Chapin, who gave away a fortune to battle poverty.

In “The Ultimate Lunchroom,” Chapin dishes about a school environment where students grow their own food — a concept not lost on PS 58, which already has such a program.

Nosh-friendly games, an artery-declogging lunch, and a student exhibition will help to fuel one’s inner foodie; what’s more, attendees are invited to bring their own food-related pieces of art, to celebrate the 66th anniversary of the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization.

Food Day at PS 58 [330 Smith St. between Carroll Street and First Place in Carroll Gardens, (347)-329-5093], Oct. 23, noon-3 pm. Tickets, $12 for individuals, and $30 for families up to five. For info, visit www.brooklynfoodcoalition.ning.com.

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