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June 28, 2012 / Brooklyn news / Crown Heights / Meadows of Shame

Trees chopped down at 'Bedford Avenue Community Park'

Arborcide at Bedford Avenue garden! Neighbors mourn deaths of beloved trees

The Brooklyn Paper
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Tree lovers on Bedford Avenue are hunting a pair of arbor slashers who allegedly chopped down dozens of maples then tossed them into a wood-chipper and drove away in a car with an obscured license plate.

The chainsaw-wielding tree-killers cut through a fence then chopped down 45 shrubs and trees — some of them 30 feet tall — inside a gated garden near Park Place on June 17, according to neighbors who snapped photographic evidence of the slaughter.

The man-on-tree violence outrages neighbors, who say the greenspace is a comforting and much-loved community meet-up spot that was gifted to residents of nearby buildings for use as a garden in 1994 by a non-profit.

“It’s close to our hearts,” said neighbor Ginger Clark.

Clark — who called the incident “tragic and unexplained” — said she and other garden-goers awoke to the sound of chainsaws just after 6:30 am on the day of the massacre and gathered in front of the mini-park and watched in horror as two men tossed the trees into a portable mulching machine, then drove away in a black Mercedes Benz truck.

Witness Larry Francis said the driver covered the truck’s license plate with a silver flap so he could not be tracked.

Neighbors are upset — and they’re not sure whose responsible.

The blog I Love Franklin Ave published a memo from some garden-supporters who claim a developer has been trying to seize the lot, which many call the “Bedford Avenue Community Park.”

Records show the land has long belonged to private owners — and was sold last week to a group called Bedford Realty LLC. The new owners could not be reached for comment.

Some residents have filed a police report with 77th Precinct, which did not return calls seeking comment by press time.

Garden advocates held a candlelight vigil on June 27.

“Those trees brought a comfort and shade to the block,” Francis said. “It’s upsetting.”

Reach reporter Natalie O'Neill at noneill@cnglocal.com or by calling her at (718) 260-4505.

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Reader Feedback

K. from ArKady says:
Invasive species are a real problem, and insect pests like the ones you are dealing with can be pernicious and very difficult to eliminate. It's too late for these trees, but here in ArKady, we've had good results protecting trees by studding their trunks with common 3" nails. Use finish nails and set them with a nail punch; no unsightly heads to mar the beauty of your bark! Has some other side effects, but hardly worth noting in this this short space. Start at the base, and random space a few nails up to waist height. Simple, invisible, and completely protects the tree from boring and cutting insects.
June 29, 2012, 1:08 pm
steve from park place says:
Its really not humane no feelings for the youth.Nature will repay
July 3, 2012, 1:04 am
JD123 from Prospect Heights says:
I"m sorry but this land was private property. Nothing wrong was done, legally (or at least it cannot be proven as of today). Quit complaining.
July 21, 2012, 3:45 pm

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