Sections

One killed, four injured in Fort Greene building collapse

Carlton Avenue building collapse stuns neighbors

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like The Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

A construction worker was killed and four others were injured — one seriously — on Monday morning when the Carlton Avenue building they were working on collapsed underneath them.

Department of Buildings officials said five workers were loading cinder blocks and other heavy materials onto the top of the still- under-construction project between DeKalb and Willoughby avenues when the floor gave way at 9:15 am — sending two workers plunging to the basement.

A 67-year-old worker who had not been identified by Monday afternoon was taken to the Brooklyn Hospital, where he died of his injuries. A second member of the construction crew was in serious condition at Kings County Hospital, an FDNY spokesman said.

Block residents said they heard a loud noise seconds before the building collapsed.

“I was having coffee when I heard a bam, bam, bam!” Said Joe Louis, who lives down the block from the construction site and said he always crosses the street instead of walking under the building’s scaffolding. “My nephew asked me if it was thunder, but I said no because it was so clear outside.”

The city Department of Buildings was still trying to find the exact cause of the collapse by Monday afternoon, but some residents say workers were rushing the job.

“Somebody really screwed up is my guess — the building wasn’t ready to hold the load,” said Tim Rutgers, an independent contractor who said he saw workers loading cinder blocks on the top of the under-construction row houses planned for the landmarked Fort Greene historic district. “Construction is a dangerous job, but with a brand new construction, that shouldn’t happen.”

Workers at the site agreed with Rutgers assessment.

“The load was to heavy, Ignatius Regis, a bricklayer working on the building told the New York Times. “I heard a big noise and I saw this guy go down.”

The Fire Department said that engines were on the scene two minutes after the 911 call was made, but that it took 20 minutes to extricate the two workers from the basement rubble.

Reach reporter Eli Rosenberg at erosenberg@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-2531. And follow him at twitter.com/emrosenberg.

Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like The Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Reader Feedback

Sam Hudson from Fort Green says:
It was such a sad thing to see. You think you know what is going to happen when it dosen't. But it should have been no suprise. Just look at all the buildings going up on DeKalb. To fast, too cheap construction, too up. I just we all knew one would fall down sooner or later. The mayor must, before he leaves office.
Sept. 11, 2012, 1:46 am
John Wasserman from Windsor Terrace says:
Hello, Sam. My name is John Wasserman. I find your comment to be very confusing to read/understand. Would you mind re-posting it? Thank you in advance.
Sept. 11, 2012, 1:12 pm

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.