Today’s news:

Paris Cabaret replaced by Con Amore Cabaret

Keep her off the pole: Newest Hook nightspot won’t have strippers

The Brooklyn Paper

We’ll stay classy, Red Hook.

That’s the promise of the owners of the area’s new Con Amore Cabaret that opened on Commerce Street between Richards and Columbia streets late last month in the same location where the shadowy Paris Cabaret featured racy entertainment including pole dancing, endless loops of “Girls Gone Wild” videos, lap dances, and private rooms.

Instead, the husband and wife team of Earl Dicks and Cynthia Thomas-Dicks say they will target the over-30 crowd with jazz bands, rock ’n roll, DJs, salsa, and stand-up comedians.

“We would have liked the option of being able to have burlesque, but the community board was dead set against any type of burlesque,” said Dicks. “That’s why we dropped the request.”

After the couple revised their business plan, Con Amore in November finally won the committee’s recommendation for a liquor license. Approval came despite committee members’ concerns about crowd noise and loud music, as well as the venue’s troubled history.

“The stripper poles are gone – there’s no real need for stripper poles,” said Dicks. Instead, the nightclub has all new tables, chairs, and sound and lighting equipment.

But neighbors in the manufacturing zone surrounding the venue have already taken their complaints about loud music to the community board, according to some Community Board 6 members.

“It’s a music venue and I’m not sure that the sound proofing is going to be sufficient for the nature of the operation,” said Red Hook resident and CB6 member Lou Sones. “There already have been complaints by neighbors about noise, even before they opened.”

Dicks measured the sound inside the place with decibel system to make sure that area residents won’t be disturbed. He claimed that he has yet to hear a noise complaint.

Skeptical neighbors say that it’s difficult to imagine that the new establishment will be any different given the history of the property’s deceitful predecessors. In 2008, the space housed a dance club called Hello Brooklyn. It was operated by a party promoter who was arrested for selling booze without a license.

“It’s hard to remain unbiased given the history of the place even though it’s a new [owner],” said CB6 member Glen Kelly. “The previous two operators just turned it into strip clubs and the neighbors complained ... hopefully this guy is not going to go the same way, but that’s always a risk.”

Dicks previously ran a downtown jazz club called Studio 243. He said he’ll use his experience with legitimate event promotion and crowd control to succeed with Con Amore.

“That’s what separates us from whoever might have been there before,” said Dicks. “I don’t think there is anything like what we are offering in Red Hook.”

Reach reporter Natalie Musumeci at nmusumeci@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-4505. Follow her at twitter.com/souleddout.

Pin It
Print this story Permalink

Reader Feedback

Joey from Clinton Hills says:
I never heard of Studio 243...has anybody? Where was it located? ("downtown" is rather vague.) What was it like?
May 28, 2013, 10:29 am
Frank A. from Flatbush says:
"Skeptical neighbors say that it’s difficult to imagine that the new establishment will be any different given the history of the property’s deceitful predecessors. In 2008, the space housed a dance club called Hello Brooklyn. It was operated by a party promoter who was arrested for selling booze without a license. " Now there's a pretty absurd statement -- a new business, new owners, but some closed-minded individual already has maligned them with the sins of the past...huh? What nonsense! I am guessing if this were Salem in 1685, these same stunted people would heading the "witch" trials and burning people at the stake.
How bout we stop prejudging these new owners and give them support so a decent business can open and thrive, which, when that happens is always good for any neighborhood.
May 28, 2013, 2:19 pm

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Links