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Thanksgiving restaurants, turkey, and pies in Brooklyn

The Brooklyn Thanksgiving dining decider

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Pecan or pumpkin? Cook all day or order in? Don’t be a goose this Turkey Day — leave all those tough decisions to science! The Brooklyn Paper’s crack team of Thanksgiving experts have compiled a foolproof, step-by-step formula for establishing exactly how you will be giving yourself heartburn this Nov. 28.

1. Mile End Delicatessen

If you are celebrating Hanukkah and Thanksgiving on the same day this year, there is no need to choose between either holiday’s traditional cuisine thanks to Boerum Hill Jewish deli Mile End, which is offering the best of both worlds on its Hanukkah catering menu. Go traditional with braised brisket or roasted turkey and gravy. Or try a mash-up by way of the sweet-potato-and-butternut-squash latkes or the challah-and-pumpernickel stuffing. Order by Nov. 24.

Mile End Delicatessen [97 Hoyt St. between Atlantic Avenue and Pacific Street in Boerum Hill, (718) 852–7510, www.mileenddeli.com].

2. The Farm on Adderley

It’s one thing to pay upwards of $50 for an adult’s Thanksgiving dinner, but there is no way your kid is going to eat all those pricey Brussel sprouts. Fortunately, Ditmas Park’s the Farm on Adderley is also offering a children’s Thanksgiving plate for only $25, alongside its $55 three-course menu for grown-ups. Reservations at farmreservations@gmail.com.

The Farm on Adderley [1108 Cortelyou Rd., between Stratford and Westminster roads in Ditmas Park, (718) 287–3101, www.thefarmonadderley.com].

3. Frankies Spuntino

The bird is the word at Frankies Spuntino and Prime Meats, which are offering a choice between turkey, turkey, and turkey on their $48, three-course menu. The Carroll Gardens sister restaurants’ regular menus will also be available all day if you would still rather eat pasta. Reservations at reception@frankspm.com.

Frankies Spuntino [457 Court St., between Luquer Street and Fourth Place in Carroll Gardens, (718) 403–0033, www.frankiesspuntino.com].

4. Reynard

For those who do not want to eat turkey on Thanksgiving (why do you hate America?), Brooklyn’s hippest hotel restaurant also has a choice of “hunter-style” rabbit or roasted striped bass as part of its $85, four-course menu. Call for reservations.

Reynard at Wythe Hotel [80 Wythe Ave. at N. 11th Street in Williamsburg, (718) 460–8004, www.reynardnyc.com.]

5. Marlow and Daughters

This hipster butcher shop promises heritage turkeys that have smaller breasts and bigger legs — and because this is a family holiday, we are not even going to make a crack about that. Like all self-respecting Williamsburgers, the birds are also hormone- and antibiotic-free, and raised on a vegetarian diet. Turkeys cost $8.05 a pound. Call to reserve.

Marlow and Daughters [95 Broadway at Berry Street in Williamsburg, (718) 388–5700, www.marlowanddaughters.com].

6. BKLYN Larder

No bones about it, BKLYN Larder’s turkey rolls provide all the gobbling without any messy leftovers or pointy bits. White and dark meat from pasture-raised birds is brined and rolled into a tasty tube ‘o turkey, then filled with traditional stuffing. Soup, sides, pies, and all the other seasonal suspects are also available, but order soon — the deadline is Nov. 22. Turkey rolls are $24 a pound.

BKLYN Larder [228 Flatbush Ave. between Sixth Avenue and Bergen Street in Park Slope, (718) 783–1250, www.bklynlarder.com].

7. Mable’s Smokehouse and Banquet Hall

Talk about Southern hospitality. This Williamsburg barbecue joint will not only brine, rub, and smoke a turkey for you, it will also deliver the whole thing to your door on Thanksgiving Day. Turkeys start at $100, and delivery is $25 to $40. Pre-order by Nov. 22.

Mable’s Smokehouse [44 Berry St. at North 11th Street in Williamsburg, (718) 218–6655, www.mablessmokehouse.com].

8. The Meatball Shop

Once a weird seasonal special, now an annual tradition, the Meatball Shop’s Gobble Gobble Balls roll turkey, stuffing, and cranberries into one festive little sphere. In stores Nov. 25. $7 gets you three turkey balls and two balls of stuffing.

The Meatball Shop [170 Bedford Ave. between Seventh and Eighth streets in Williamsburg, (718) 551–0520, www.themeatballshop.com].

9. Momofuku Milk Bar

How do you make a buttery croissant even more decadent? Stuff a whole Thanksgiving dinner inside of it. Momofuku’s now-legendary Thanksgiving Croissants pack roast turkey, gravy, and cranberry sauce into a single snack that will make your mouth water and your arteries cringe. Each croissant is $4.50.

Milk Bar Williamsburg (382 Metropolitan Ave. at Havemeyer Street in Williamsburg, www.milkbarstore.com). Milk Bar Carroll Gardens (360 Smith St., at Second Place in Carroll Gardens, www.milkbarstore.com).

10. Four & Twenty Blackbirds

This Gowanus bakery is locally famous for its spins on traditional Thanksgiving pies — like brown-butter pumpkin and bittersweet chocolate pecan — but its honey-and-salted caramel apple pies have also developed a cult fall following. The store’s Thanksgiving pre-orders are already fully booked, but a small number of whole pies will be available each morning from Nov. 26 to 28. Set your alarm clock if you want a slice of the action — pie lovers reportedly start lining up at 6 am to get their hands on one. Pies start at $38.

Four & Twenty Blackbirds [439 Third Ave. at Eighth Street in Gowanus, (718) 499–2917, www.birdsblack.com].

11. Bien Cuit

This French-inspired Cobble Hill bakery covers the classics — with a boozy kick. Its pumpkin pie has a bourbon butterscotch glaze and its pecan pie is made with vanilla whisky custard. Pies are $35 each. Pre-order by Nov. 25.

Bien Cuit [120 Smith St. between Pacific and Dean streets in Cobble Hill, (718) 852–0200, www.biencuit.com].

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