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A woman’s fall turned a deserted B and Q platform into a mass good deed

Saved by the yells: Crowd rushes to rescue unconscious woman from Atlantic subway tracks

The Brooklyn Paper
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Dozens of commuters rallied to save a woman who fell onto the subway tracks from being crushed by a train pulling into the Atlantic Avenue–Barclays Center station this afternoon.

The lady passed out on the platform and then fell onto the tracks at about 12:40 pm, when the B and Q platform was nearly deserted, according to witnesses.

“I heard her plop,” said Gary Gaymor, a health department inspector who was on his way to lunch in Flatbush when the near-tragedy occurred.

The handful of straphangers waiting for their trains began screaming and leaped into action, according to witnesses. Two men jumped down onto the tracks but struggled to lift the woman as a train approached the station. Others ran to the upper level and, within moments, dozens more people materialized downstairs, eight helping to hoist the woman onto the platform and 20 to 30 others rushing to the end to try to halt the train, a witness said.

“It was about to come, but they stopped it,” said Jasmine Valle, an aspiring medical technician. “It took eight people to lift her up because she was dead weight. If it wasn’t for them, god forbid to think what would have happened.”

The good Samaritans vanished into the station once the woman was out of harm’s way, leaving her alone, still unconscious and bleeding on the platform, according to Valle who said she rolled her onto her back and performed CPR while awaiting first responders, who in this case were actually second responders.

Fire department paramedics and police carried the woman out on a stretcher at 1 pm. She was taken to Brooklyn Hospital, but a fire official did not know her condition.

Nathan Tempey is a Deputy Editor at the Community Newspaper Group. Reach him at ntempey@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-4504. Follow him at twitter.com/nathantempey.
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Reasonable discourse

Artie from Brooklyn says:
This is my grandmother. She is right now in ICU and all prayers are welcome, as she is critical.

To the people who jumped the tracks and others who helped: May God bestow blessings on you! You are everything that is great about humanity in the midst of this world. Our family wants to thank you from the bottom of your hearts.
Dec. 18, 2013, 9:45 pm
Noemi from Brooklyn says:
Hi Artie!

I am so happy to hear an update on your grandmother! My son is the one who grabbed your grandmother from the 2 guys on the track and pulled her over. His name is Marquise and he's 28 years old. He was on his way to school. My family, friends and I are praying for your grandmother's full recovery! Please keep us updated! Thank you and God Bless!
Dec. 19, 2013, 8:59 am
Noemi from Brooklyn says:
I meant to say he's 18 years old, not 28.
Dec. 19, 2013, 9:10 am
Clara K. from Brooklyn says:
I was there too. Thank you for leaving a message, Artie. I am glad the police was able to identify your grandmother. (Her shopping cart and her hat remained on the tracks.)

The first guy who jumped unto the tracks was Mexican and the four other guys who followed jumped in to help. The guys who saved her did not vanish as this article mentions. Then other guys on the platform helped pull the four guys from the tracks.

We are New Yorkers!!! Always there to help.
Dec. 19, 2013, 9:52 am
Artie from Brooklyn says:
Unfortunately Basya (or Bella as we called her) passed away this evening. We are very sad, as she was the most wonderful, giving person who we loved dearly.
She is survived by a son, 2 grandchildren, 5 great grandchildren who enjoyed her food, love and hugs.

Thank you once again to all of you for rescuing her, thereby elevating the world with your good deed, as well as to allow us to say our goodbyes, and to bury her properly in one piece.

God Bless - May we all hear only good news,

Artie
Dec. 22, 2013, 12:21 am
Riki from Brooklyn says:
Hi Artie,

Thank you for the update! I am truly sorry for your loss! Baruch dayan ha'emes! may she be a meilitz yosher for all of us!

I would also like to say thank you to all those who helped this women! this story is sad yet amazing at the same time! I am truly proud of New York today! I take the trains a lot and I would never expect such a thing to occur! I am so happy to hear that there are people out there that look out for each other! Thank you to everyone for helping me learn that!

May we share only good news in the present and in the future!
Dec. 26, 2013, 3:21 pm

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