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Original gentrifiers: Eat and drink like our Dutch forefathers at city’s oldest house

The Brooklyn Paper
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Turns out hipsters are not the first Brooklyn foodies.

The borough’s obsession with all things food and drink-related began hundreds of years ago, according to a couple of historians who are giving modern-day foodies a chance to eat like the old-school Dutch in Brooklyn — who may have eaten a little better than us.

“Without getting too political, I would say that we probably eat worse [than they did],” said Joshua Van Kirk, the executive director of the historic Wyckoff House.

“The heirloom seeds they used hadn’t been genetically modified or polluted with pesticides and were probably healthier than our system.”

The Wyckoff House, which dates to 1652, making it the oldest house in the city, will host an event dedicated to the edible history of Breuckelen’s first European inhabitants, who were invested in two staples still critical to many modern Brooklynites as well: bread and beer — or “brood” and “bier.”

Then, as now, home-brewing was booming in the borough, but without modern-day wonders like Kumbucha and vegan Bloody Marys, the colonist’s slightly less alcoholic beer flowed three meals a day for both adults and kids.

“Each outlying area of Dutch settlement — like Breuckelen — would have had its own brewer,” said Van Kirk. “Most everything had alcohol in it because the common fear of drinking water.”

Participants at the event will get to drink beer and make some bread in a traditional method cooked in a Dutch oven on a coal pit.

As the museum points out, they’ve lucked out that the passion of modern Brooklynites have come to resemble those of the borough’s first gentrifiers.

“A lot of what we’re interested in today was present 300 to 400 years ago,” said Melissa Branfman, the director of education at the house. “Brooklyn has certainly changed, but people are interested in things like farming and sustainability and eating local. That’s what the Wyckoff family was doing.”

Bread and brew at the Wyckoff House Museum [5816 Clarendon Rd. between Ralph Avenue and East 59th St. in V’Lacke Bos (718) 629–5400]. Mar. 9, 4 pm. $20, 21 and over. Reservation required.

Reach reporter Eli Rosenberg at erosenberg@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-2531. And follow him at twitter.com/emrosenberg.

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Reasonable discourse

diehipster from Normal Brooklyn says:
Really? You're gonna compare Dutch settlers, pioneers, explorers and farmers from over 300 years ago to 21st century upper middle class culdesacian hipster transplants who own 10 i-Products, grow kale on toxic factory rooftops; go canoeing in Gowanus fecal sludge; make $9.00 'artisanal' hand-crafted grilled cheese; play with beer kits in their $2000 daddy-subsidized apartments?

Basically, the Dutch founded Brooklyn; the hipsters ruined it. Everything else in between was great. End of story.
March 1, 2013, 8:47 am
diehipster from Normal Brooklyn says:
Oh, and check out this sickening list of "Brooklyn Country living". Unbelievable - I don't think one person is actually from Brooklyn in the entire slide show! And look at the map that ends at Prospect Park, LOL. But I guess that's a good thing. STAY ABOVE THE LINE!

http://www.countryliving.com/cooking/regional-foods-and-events/brooklyn-charms-0311?src=nl&mag=clg&list=nl_ccr_tvl_non_022213_brooklyn-charms#slide-6
March 1, 2013, 8:57 am
diehipster from Normal Brooklyn says:
http://www.countryliving.com/cooking/regional-foods-and-events/brooklyn-charms-0311?src=nl&mag=clg&list=nl_ccr_tvl_non_022213_brooklyn-charms#slide-6
March 1, 2013, 8:57 am
diehipster from Normal Brooklyn says:
Why is Brooklyn in Country Living???? DAMN!LOL Not one person from Brooklyn in the entire slide show!

http://www.countryliving.com/cooking/regional-foods-and-events/brooklyn-charms-0311#slide-1
March 1, 2013, 8:59 am
Mr. Suavitz from Native Brooklyn says:
I have to chime in this one. Really???? Comparing Dutch Settlers to these present day abominations? That's a comedic/desperate stretch.
March 1, 2013, 9:16 am
ty from pps says:
Well, wasn't that a fun mutual stroke-fest by Diehipster and SwampDouche.

Two sad, bitter idiots obsessing over things that have no impact on them... but may actually be enjoyable and positive for other. Pathetic.
March 1, 2013, 9:37 am
diehipster from Normal Brooklyn says:
Sorry for the multiple posts. Was giving me an error message that it didn't go through.
March 1, 2013, 9:50 am
SwampYankee from runined Brooklyn says:
wasn't an error message DH, it was Ty. gibberish looks the same
March 1, 2013, 10 am
ty from pps says:
Swampy -- What was Ty??
March 1, 2013, 10:32 am
diehipster can't read from diehipster's momma's bed says:
um, hello morons, 60 year old peter pan bakery was on that list.
March 1, 2013, 10:43 am
Matt from Ft Greene says:
Would the three of you just finally hop in the sack and get it over with?
March 1, 2013, 11:06 am
BunnynSunny from Clinton Hill says:
I think these articles are written with the intention of being extremely annoying to the reader. By calling Dutch settlers "gentrifiers" seems to imply that there was some Native American ghetto lands here. Oh, and weren't the first humans to settle on Long Island gentrifiers as well?
March 1, 2013, 12:06 pm
Dock Oscar from Puke Slop says:
Hey, I'm going to open an artisanal shop that makes hand-crafted facial tissues out of hemp. $5 a pop. Anybody want to fund me? My parents are broke.
March 1, 2013, 12:57 pm
Northside Ned from GPT says:
Is that hipster bar open in Bay Ridge yet? I'm looking forward to going down there and getting my honk on.
March 1, 2013, 1:07 pm
"Interloper" from Kent Ave says:
diehipster is so excited he was the first to comment on this article. You're a complete joke and obviously live a miserable life. Stop trolling this site and get back to your job stocking shelves at Sunac or sorting mail at the Post Office.
March 1, 2013, 3:14 pm
Mike from Williamsburg says:
Mr. Hipster, surely you realize the Brooklyn paper inserts "hispter" into as many article as possible because it is trolling you.
March 1, 2013, 6:37 pm
Pat I. from 70's Brooklyn says:
“Without getting too political, I would say that we probably eat worse [than they did],” said Joshua Van Kirk, the executive director of the historic Wyckoff House.

“The heirloom seeds they used hadn’t been genetically modified or polluted with pesticides and were probably healthier than our system.”

WRONG

You had rotting meat, moldy, rotten food, people eating out of pig bins, trichinosis, infections, sweage running down the streets, coal dust and smoke everywhere..oh and let's not forget the boatloads of slaves that were left on ships because they had yellow fever.

And while we're at it - Syphlis, VD, poor sanitation conditions, malaria, attacks by indians.

Yeahliving in the 1700's was a real f*cking scream, Jason But Genetically modified seeds made all the difference.

What a douchenozzle. With all the money your parents spent on youe education, you'd think you would have learned a but more history. But I guess it's hard to hear the professor with a ski cap pulled over your ears.
March 1, 2013, 7:58 pm
Pat I from 70's Brooklyn says:
OK DH...Swampy - Here's Jason Gaspar site. and he's ...wait for it...wait for it...AN ARTIST!!!!

http://jasongaspar.wordpress.com/

check out the videos - especially "Pee CD".

This guy makes Bansky look like Michelangelo.
March 1, 2013, 8:05 pm
Peter Piper from Park Slope says:
@Pat I - It looks like the statement was about the colonial diet, not the overall health of colonists. Its fairly established that the nutritional content of table produce is far less than what it was generations ago because of things like genetic modification and the erasure of genetic diversity in the 20th century - open a scientific journal. Colonials had the same common sense we do not to eat rotten/spoiled meat except perhaps in the most desperate circumstances. In fact, they had the sense (that I daresay you and the other Brooklyn Paper trolls have lost) not to overindulge in meat or food which is why they would have scoffed at obesity as the number one health crisis in modern America. How do you like them apples? As for all the ——ing and moaning about hipster culture overrunning Brooklyn, perhaps if the old-schoolers had taken care of their own sh*t in the 1970s-1980s when the borough lost 10% of its population due to the shear sh*ttiness of the place, you wouldn't need to the hipsters and yuppies to come in and give your property and life value.
March 2, 2013, 2:22 pm
Gangsta in Greenwood from Sunset Park says:
Uh Oh..... SNAP!!!
March 2, 2013, 11:35 pm
bkdude65 says:
He is a long way from williamsburg
March 3, 2013, 5:35 am
SwampYankee from runined Brooklyn says:
Peter Piper says :
"Its fairly established that the nutritional content of table produce is far less than what it was generations ago because of things like genetic modification and the erasure of genetic diversity in the 20th century open a scientific journal"
Well I just finished the latest issue of JAM and I didn't see anything about this. By the way, your statement is nonsense. Just take a look at the yield of new strains of rice that has such a higher yield that seed for seed it dwarfs the rice of 50 years ago. more grain=more nutrition. If you have sources please cite them. Calling your bluff here
March 3, 2013, 6:07 pm
Peter Piper from Park Slope says:
@SwampYankee - You're almost as full of sh*t as the Brooklyn you grew up in with the plastic awnings, tarpaper siding, chrome stoop railings, and industrial parking lot graveyards. Soil depletion caused by intensive agriculture associated with fast-growing genetically engineered crops, including the rice you mention, has resulted in significant nutrient loss in all sorts of edible plants: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=soil-depletion-and-nutrition-loss Furthermore, conventional agriculture's reliance on single variety crops and the "developed" world's devestment in genetic diversity is precisely what caused the 19th century's Potato Famine and what is currently threatening the common banana. Go ahead, eat your big rice and watch the collective IQ of your spawn regress until your progeny looks, acts, and thinks like bonobos (if they don't already). In the meantime, please get a life, make some friends, and stop trolling the Brooklyn Paper already!
March 3, 2013, 8:12 pm
Barry from Flatbush says:
In their defense, at least the hipsters have not given the indigenous population smallpox, yet.
March 4, 2013, 5:42 pm
Pat I. from Hit two sewers says:
Peter-

We're obese because we don't exert ourselves anymore. My 10 year old is a competitive swimmer. He eats enough for three people. 2 hour sessions 4 days a week with a one hour coaching session. And somehow I suspect colonisst burnt off far more calories than my son.

We know far more about nutrition today than we did back then. And the food today is in many ways, better , nutritionally speaking thanks to science.

When my father first came to this country he worked two jobs (chef and contruction work) remodeled a three family house on the weekend and believe it or not, played soccer for three hours on Sunday morning.

When his business took off he worked one job that primarily meant standing for 18 hours a day - not exactly physical exertion. He put on weight - about 30 pounds.
March 5, 2013, 9:04 pm
Pat I. from Hit two sewers says:
Barry-

Tru. But they did bring bedbugs. And vegan clothing.
March 5, 2013, 9:06 pm

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