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Oh G! MTA to study ‘Brooklyn Local’

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The Metropolitan Transportation Authority will conduct a comprehensive review of the G train, raising hopes that improvements to the maligned line won’t be far behind.

The MTA announced its plans to study the cross-borough route’s performance and infrastructure after state senators Daniel Squadron (D–Brooklyn Heights) and Martin Dilan (D–Bedford-Stuyvesant) hopped onboard a campaign by the commuting advocacy group the Riders Alliance that called for the implementation of free above-ground transfers, better communication about service changes, and more frequent trains.

The news comes after G straphangers scored a huge victory on the line when the MTA made permanent a now-beloved extension that provides service to Fourth Avenue–Ninth Street, Seventh Avenue, 15th Street–Prospect Park, Fort Hamilton Parkway, and Church Avenue — linking North and Brownstone Brooklyns with one-seat service.

But there may still be ways to better the four-car line.

“We had just increased the G and were still getting complaints about it, so we agreed to do the review,” said MTA spokesman Charles Seaton, who added that anyone can request a line review, but that doesn’t mean the MTA will follow through.

This is the third time Squadron has asked the MTA for such a study: the other two resulted in improvements to the F and L lines, respectively. Both times, the changes took about 11 months to implement after the start of the review.

Williamsburg straphanger Matt Arancio hopes the review will lead to more service, greater dependability, and shorter waits.

“People need to get to work and get on with their lives and the fact that there’s an unreliable train is a huge issue,” he said.

Reach reporter Danielle Furfaro at dfurfaro@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-2511. Follow her at twitter.com/DanielleFurfaro.

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Reasonable discourse

JAY from NYC says:
now can we get the r train to stop sucking and maybe bring back the express f train?
Feb. 23, 2013, 11:03 am
diehipster from Harming Haydens says:
I've done my own study:

Too many 'like yahs', try hards, tofu eaters, almond milk drinkers, never-to-be-known musicians and artists, and all other sorts of the "LOOK AT MEEEE" staycationing crowd begin boarding from 4th/9th all the way up through LIC. (except for a couple of stops where still too many scary people live).

I say make NO CHANGES AT ALL to discourage these whiny nasally self-centered transients from riding into places people don't want them. Soon they'll want docking stations to charge their phones and play their obscure music over the speaker system; or replace the kids selling Skittles with Caleb selling kale crackers.

Awwwwww, poor Ethan and Marnie want more frequent service so they can get home faster at 1am from a juvenile art show in LIC back to BoCoCa? F U B*TCHES!!!
Feb. 24, 2013, 8:06 am
Rob from Greenpoint says:
Looking forward to hearing the results!
Feb. 24, 2013, 9:13 am
scott from park slope says:
Diehipster, you're the whiniest Nancy I've ever seen. Not even the whimpiest kid from gym class with scrawny arms and legs and sunken chest feels threatened by hipsters yet here you are day after day after day crying the sky is falling. Please do all the real men and women in Brooklyn a favor and gather up your skirts and take your shrewish, effeminate PMS crap elsewhere. Maybe you, SwampYankee, and Pat can go form a coffee klatsch in southern Jersey where you sit around in drag and kvetch.
Feb. 24, 2013, 2:49 pm
scott from park slope says:
The G train is an excellent connection to Queens. I use it to take my kids to the Hall of Science all the time. It also connects a great bunch of neighborhoods from LIC through Williamsburg, Clinton Hill and all the others down to Windsor Terrace. Better service on the G will translate to more economic and creative vigor in this Brooklyn Renaissance we're in. That means a better tax base, safer streets, better schools, and higher quality of life for everyone.
Feb. 24, 2013, 2:56 pm
manposeur from brokelyn says:
Yeah!!! Taking the G more frequently!
Now only the city had the billions to build another line.
Feb. 24, 2013, 4:43 pm
Myrtle Willoughby from Bed-Stuy says:
Anyone who actually rides the G train in Brooklyn would know that it's mostly working-class people using the train to get from places like Kensington to downtown Brooklyn or Bed-Stuy to make the L connection into Manhattan at Metropolitan/Lorimer. I don't see why some mentally ill people are fixated on "hipsters." People of all races and economic classes ride the G train, and they are all entitled to good service.
Feb. 25, 2013, 2:41 pm
old time brooklyn from slope says:
there is no kensington - it is flatbush an original town - if the need supports the servie it is end of story
Feb. 25, 2013, 9:41 pm

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