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Randy reading: Literary series comes to Park Slope sex shop

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The reading series is both sexual and textual.

A Park Slope mom is bringing a lust-themed reading series to Bergen Street sex toy haven Babeland for neighbors who want to explore their sexuality through the written word.

“I love the idea of literary events in unexpected places,” said curator and former Brooklyn Paper columnist Louise Crawford. “There’s so much great writing about sexuality, sensuality, and intimacy, so it just seems like a fun place and a fun idea.”

On March 7, “Books in Babeland” will kick off with several local writers, including Nicole Callihan, a lecturer at New York University and author of the recently published poetry book “SuperLoop,” and Diana Raab, whose poetry anthology “Lust” chronicles the complexities of sexual intimacy.

“Every poem is extremely sensual and very honest and brave about the experience of wanting love and joy,” said Crawford of “Lust.”

The series is an opportunity for locals to dig into their deepest sexual desires in the midst of Babeland, which offers a host of sex toys, including dildos, vibrators, and “Fifty Shades of Grey” beginners bondage kits. Nobody should be afraid to let loose in the store, said Crawford, who emphasized that sexual liberation should be encouraged for women and men.

“There’s nothing to be ashamed about,” she said.

The next installation of “Books in Babeland” will be in May. Titled “Sexy Edgy Moms,” it will focus on poetry, memoir, and fiction that revolves around motherhood and sensuality. Crawford also hopes to have an open mic, where neighbors can bring their favorite sex-themed works or even read their own original work. And there is no better place to let it all out than Park Slope’s sex-positive showroom, she insists.

“It’s this really positive environment that affirms the sexual and affirms everyone’s needs to pleasure themselves,” Crawford said.

“Books in Babeland” at Babeland [462 Bergen St. between Fifth and Sixth avenues in Park Slope, (718) 638–3820, www.babeland.com]. March 7 at 7 pm. Free.

Reach reporter Megan Riesz at mriesz@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-4505. Follow her on Twitter @meganriesz.
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Reader Feedback

Joey from Clinton Hills says:
Are men allowed to attend?
March 7, 2014, 1:41 pm
DC from PArk SLop says:
Just what Park Slope needs more perverts! Like we do not have enough
March 12, 2014, 3:05 pm

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