Sections

Schemers trick senior, take her money

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

68th Precinct

Bay Ridge—Dyker Heights

Grift for grandma

Two schemers posing as National Grid workers conned their way into an 87-year-old woman’s Ovington Avenue home and stole $7,000 in cash from her on Aug. 8, per the NYPD.

The pair showed up at the woman’s doorstep between 13th and 14th avenues in Dyker Heights at 12:38 pm and said they needed to check her water, polices said. One fraudster flashed an ID, and the victim let them in even though she couldn’t read the ID without her glasses, she told police.

The mountebank meter men had the octogenarian turn all the faucets on in her home and abruptly left, a report states. After they departed, the woman noticed that cash was missing from a makeup box and the top drawer of her nightstand, police said.

Jewelry jacker strikes again

A trinket was stolen from a Bay Ridge jewelry store after a man walked in asking to take a look at an engagement ring — and then fled band in hand on Aug. 20, officers said.

The thief entered a shop on 86th Street between Battery and Seventh avenues in Bay Ridge at 11:20 am asking to see engagement rings, but once he got his mitts on one, he bolted from the store and skedaddled down Fifth Avenue, police said.

This is the fourth such incident in as many weeks in the 68th Precinct, police reports show.

Blade raiders

Two villains with a box-cutter robbed two women walking in Shore Road Park on Aug. 17, police stated.

The ladies were strolling through the park near Bay Ridge Parkway in Bay Ridge at 10:40 pm when a pair of punks flashed a blade and said “Give me your cellphone, there will be no problem,” a police report states.

The lowlifes took a backpack with a wallet and a cellphone before fleeing, law enforcement officials said.

Bandit busted

Police arrested a suspect in a separate box-cutter-related robbery at the corner of Fifth Avenue and 73rd Street on Aug. 22, according to a report.

The victim was walking on the sidewalk at 10:10 pm when the alleged attacker busted out his blade and told him, “Give me everything in your pockets,” per cops.

The accused then started choking his victim and took $160 from the victim’s pocket, police said. Cops canvassed the area and picked up a 23-year-old on suspicion of the crime, officers recounted. Police recovered $160 in cash from the suspect, according to the authorities.

— Max Jaeger

Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Reasonable discourse

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.