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George Weber butcher convicted of murder

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The 19-year-old male prostitute accused of stabbing WABC newscaster George Weber 50 times during a kinky sex romp in Weber’s Carroll Gardens home was convicted of murder at his second trial on Tuesday — and now he’s facing life in prison.

Last year, a jury determining John Katehis’s fate couldn’t render a verdict when, after two and a half days of deliberation, jury members failed to convince the last hold out.

But it took less than a day for a new jury to find Katehis guilty of butchering Weber, a regular commentator on WABC’s “Curtis and Kuby” program starring Guardian Angels founder Curtis Sliwa.

Katehis met Weber in March, 2009, through a Craigslist ad. The teen agreed to come to the older man’s Henry Street apartment, between Carroll and President streets, knowing he would be paid for sex.

Several hours later, Weber was found dead. Cops quickly linked the case to Katehis, who was arrested a few days later.

But Katehis’s attorneys claim that the teen was defending himself when he killed Weber — who had wanted to have rough sex with the teen.

In a videotaped confession, Katehis giggled as he recalled Weber’s desires to be bound and smothered. But things got out of control — and horribly gory — when Weber pulled a knife, Katehis claimed.

“I got paranoid. I went to grab the knife; he was supposed to be smothered, not [do] something with a knife,” Katehis said before pointing to his throat. “The knife just goes in and jabs him in the neck.”

Katehis claimed he stabbed Weber once, but a city medical examiner determined that the newscaster had been stabbed 50 times.

Throughout the first trial, Katehis’s lawyer made an issue out of Weber’s alleged interest in bondage and rough sex. He also claimed that the newscaster had plied the teen with booze and cocaine before taking him to his bedroom.

Katehis’s defense adopted the same strategy this time around, but fell under an avalanche of evidence provided by Assistant District Attorney Anna-Sigga Nicolazzi, who told the new jury how Weber was killed in painstaking detail.

Katehis is expected to be sentenced on Dec. 7.

Pol’s bribery punt

A federal jury failed to convict Assemblyman William Boyland, Jr. of bribery charges last Thursday — claiming that prosecutors didn’t connect the dots between the legislator’s $175,000 no-show job with Brookdale Hospital and the millions in state funding he managed to secure for the hospital.

“[Prosecuto­rs] didn’t give us enough evidence to convict him and send him to jail,” one juror told the New York Daily News last week, after a jubilant Boyland was seen pumping his fists in the air outside of Manhattan Federal Court.

“Of course I’m happy that the jury voted for us,” Boyland told reporters outside the court. “My team was incredible. I’m looking forward to going back to service.”

Federal prosecutors told the jury that the Brownsville legislator had worked for Brookdale’s parent company, MediSys, before his political career started, but was still drawing a salary from Brookdale Hospital even though he never work there.

Prosecutors claimed that the salary was a never-ending bribe; ensuring that Boyland would continually steer state dollars toward MediSys, which owns several hospitals in Brooklyn and Queens.

Yet Boyland’s attorneys said there was nothing wrong with the deal Boyland had with MediSys — and that there was no quid-pro-quo.

The jury deliberated for three days before rendering its decision.

Reach reporter Thomas Tracy at ttracy@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-2525.
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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