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Pesticide spraying in Marine park

City's war against the West Nile Virus hits Marine Park

Brooklyn Daily
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Mosquitoes buzzing about Marine Park, Flatlands, and Georgetown will want to be dining somewhere else tonight.

The city says it will spray pesticides in these neighborhoods, as well as Canarsie, East Flatbush, Spring Creek, and Starrett City beginning at 8 pm tonight in its ongoing war against West Nile Virus.

Health Department officials say the spraying of the pesticide Anvil 10+10 will continue until 6 am Friday morning.

The pesticide, which is usually sprayed from the back of a truck, is not harmful to humans and pets, but the city is recommending residents stay indoors if possible, especially if one suffers from asthma or other respiratory conditions.

West Nile Virus, which is transmitted through mosquito bites, can cause viral meningitis in residents over 50. To date, 252 residents have been diagnosed with the disease since it was discovered in 1999.

So far, the West Nile Virus has spared Brooklyn: this year’s only victim contracted the disease in Staten Island, city officials said.

For information on how to prevent the spread of West Nile Virus, visit nyc.gov/health.

Reach Deputy Editor Thomas Tracy at ttracy@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-2525.
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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