Sections

Stan: Sesame Street is too big to get government dollars

Brooklyn Daily
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Cheryl of Pembroke Pines is a lovely gal and has a nice family, but she sure could use some help in the political crevices of her medulla. She’s been busy telling her friends that mothers will not vote for Mitt Romney because he doesn’t like Big Bird.

Sorry, Cheryl. Perhaps you missed the discussion because you were busy channel hopping between the debate and the Yankee game. Just in case you are one of the 15 or 20 people on earth that didn’t actually hear the words, this is exactly what Gov. Romney told the moderator, Jim Lehrer:

“I’m sorry, Jim. I’m going to stop the subsidy to PBS. I’m going to stop other things. I like PBS. I love Big Bird. I actually like you, too. But I’m not going to — I’m not going to keep on spending money on things to borrow money from China to pay for it.”

Note this, Cheryl. The man never said he doesn’t like Big Bird. He merely said, and I do agree with him, that this nation should stop borrowing money to pay for certain extravagances.

I am a taxpayer and I resent my money being spent on phony art such as a crucifix in a beaker of urine, or a money machine such as Sesame Street. And a lucrative machine it is. Its IRS Form 990, which is now a public record, tells us that the company reported, for the year 2010, revenue of over $133,000,000. Elmo, Oscar the Grouch, and Big Bird own more than $30 million dollars in securities. It are so successful that the annual salary of the Sesame Street Workshop’s CEO is almost a million bucks a year. The average annual salary of the top 21 executives is more than $400,000. You and I earn nowhere that amount, and yet it sounds as if you are willing to send a part of the taxes you pay to them. I’m not.

• • •

Last month I presented my scathing thoughts concerning pedophiles. A communication from a reader disagreed. He believes that pedophiles deserve a second chance and is using his first-hand experiences to run a workshop. I respect his opinions and efforts, but I still disagree.

This week we learned the fate of Penn State’s Jerry Sandusky. So far one of my two wishes about his future came true. For his sins, I wanted him put away for the rest of his life. Thank you, your honor. My other wish is that he spends all of his time in the can mingling with the general population. I believe everyone knows why.

• • •

I don’t get it. When there were 145,000 new jobs it didn’t move the needle, but 114,000 new jobs did by 0.3 percent? Something doesn’t smell right.

• • •

The unbiased Yahoo poll question asked “Was the Libya attack preventable?”

Of the almost 300,000 people who responded, 73 percent said “Yes, if there was more security.”

We have recently learned about the requests for more security. Memo to Mr. Rude himself, Joe Biden: You stated “We weren’t told they wanted more security.” Two security officers who worked for the State Department in Libya testified before a congressional hearing, under oath, that they repeatedly asked for more security.

At that very same hearing, two State Department officials admitted they had denied those requests. Mr. Biden, either you are clueless or you are a liar. Some of the liberals we know are attempting to cover for him by saying that he simply did not know. Really? Every barber and every cab driver in America knew and you, my vice-president, the very important man who is a heartbeat away from the big chair, didn’t know?

That’s a crock.

Shame, shame, shame on you and every member of this administration that turned their backs on the requests.

I am StanGershbein@Bellsouth.net telling my vice-president that there is a world of difference between being aggressive and being obnoxious.

Read Stan Gershbein's column every Monday on BrooklynDaily.com.
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:


Reasonable discourse

Comments closed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Hey there, Brooklyn Daily reader!

Yes, you’re in the right place — Brooklyn Paper is the new online home of BrooklynDaily.com.

So bookmark this page, and remember check it throughout the day for the latest stories from your neighborhood — and across this great borough of ours.