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To the editor,

I whole-heartedly agree that express service should be restored to the F train in Brooklyn. I was able to enjoy the benefits of express service until I retired in 2003. However there was, and still is, another problem with the F service, and probably with other trains going to and from Coney Island as well. Many trains terminate at Kings Highway, five stations away from the last stop in Coney Island. Passengers going further have to wait on the elevated platform in boiling-hot or freezing-cold weather until another train arrives.

I understand the need to avoid congestion at the Coney Island station. What I don’t understand is why they can’t get the arriving trains out of the station at the last stop as soon as they unload, either by sending them right back to Manhattan or to the train yard. I would rather wait five minutes on a heated or air-conditioned train while other trains are being cleared out of Coney Island than to be forced to leave my train and stand on a snow-covered platform shivering until another train comes in. Winter is here! It’s time to take all trains to the last stop.

All stations are used by senior citizens and people with disabilities, at one time or another. All stations need elevators or escalators. Many stations need repair work, especially on stairways at elevated stations. Fares keep going up, but transportation services and stairways do not get any better. Many seniors who need elevators cannot use the subways in their neighborhoods. They are forced to use Access-A-Ride.

The city would save money in the long run, if it spent more on making subways accessible to seniors and other physically-challenged, would-be passengers, and would improve the service on city buses. Then fewer people would need to use Access-A-Rides. Elaine Kirsch

Gravesend

‘Absurd’ Shav

To the editor,

Shavana Abruzzo mentions things I want to comment on in her column “Give thanks for the United States” (A Britisher’s View, Nov 27).

She criticized poor people for having a television or other entertainment. If someone is poor, it doesn’t mean they shouldn’t have any pleasure, such as having a television. She says the Heritage Foundation is her source — it’s a right-wing think tank and they wouldn’t know the truth if it came and hit them. It’s not impartial. She says that a “bum” (homeless person) can make $200 an hour on the street. That’s the most absurd thing I have ever heard! Maybe people should quit their jobs and enjoy the good life on the street. Another thing I never heard of is a jail cell being described as “comfy.” Maybe people should commit a crime and get better housing in jail. Of course these things are absurd. If you think they’re not, there’s a bridge I want to sell you.Jerome Frank

Coney Island

Call to CB10

To the editor,

I am writing to request that Community Board 10 call for a resolution stating its strong support for the NYPD and the 68th Precinct at its next general meeting.

As has been publicly reported in various media outlets, one of its members recently participated in an anti-police demonstration on December 3 outside Gracie Mansion and was arrested. This demonstration was led by the Justice League of New York. A video of the event shows one of the protesters screaming in the face of a police officer, “Nobody looks at you like a hero, just a racist.” Additionally, chants about the “violence of the racist police” permeated throughout the crowd of protesters.

For many years I have worked closely with our NYPD and 68th Precinct, both as president of the 68th Precinct Youth Council and as a member of the 68th Precinct Community Council. I know that the views expressed at this anti-police protest do not represent the people of Bay Ridge and Dyker Heights, as our communities have always been among the strongest supporters of the NYPD. The board should not let the actions of one of its members call this into question.

During my time as director of community boards under former Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz, which included working with all 18 boards in Brooklyn, I have seen first-hand how the actions of board members can unfortunately be associated with the entire community board. When this occurs, boards have acted to demonstrate the views of the board. I encourage Community Board 10 to call for a resolution supporting the NYPD. Members are free to vote as they wish, but I am confident that the vast majority of the board will vote yes.Bob Capano

Bay Ridge

Elliott Kibosh

To the editor,

Provoked by Elliott Abosh’s letter on truth serum being superior to waterboarding as a confession motivator (“Truth Serum,” Sound off to the Editor, Dec. 4), I noted the quid pro quo offered the terrorists: freedom and pardon!

This needs a reality check. Imagine liberating an avowed fanatical potential mass-murderer, radically Islamic or not, as a reward! I guess that also obviates deportation or exile. Further, a precept was stated: “...but you do not fight fire with fires.” Tell that to the forest firefighters who consistently use a backburn (back-fire) to halt and control the spread of a forest fire.

To mix the metaphor, Trump and other waterboarding proponents favor fighting fire with water. How novel. Misguided compassion is a dangerous virtue. How often “we can’t be like them” is the fatal slogan that gets hesitant gunfighters killed in the Western movie duels. Translation: They aim to kill us, so we not only won’t be like them, but we just won’t be. Terrorism has spawned analytical confusion and madness among our citizenry and political “leadership,” and it has become viral. It doesn’t take a clairvoyant to see how such pathology fuels the growing clamor for “Trump serum.” J. J. Lauria

Sheepshead Bay

• • •

To the editor,

So now there is a big brouhaha against presidential candidate Donald Trump for proposing a full and perfectly legal temporary ban on immigration and visitation of individuals from Muslim countries. The same ban was legally proposed, then carried out by President Carter and other earlier Democratic presidents, and not a peep was heard out of the press or public.

The recent news flash over the biased media should make Trump’s proposal even more apropos — Islamic State terrorists, during their Syrian invasion, have obtained passport-making equipment and blank passports, making it possible for terrorists to make false documentation and be able to travel freely throughout Europe, America, and the world. Whaddaya say about “The Donald’s” proposal now?

Robert W. Lobenstein

Marine Park

Save the elephants

To the editor,

I am generally a supporter of the National Rifle Association, but I find poachers and trophy hunters, whom the organization supports, reprehensible. I can understand killing certain animals for food, or killing bears and raccoons who over populate or invade people’s homes, but this is not the case with the African nor Asian elephants, which cannot be cross bred.

It is high time this cruel practice ceases to exist and we allow the species to reproduce by not invading its natural habitats. If we continue our ways, both species of elephants will soon be extinct and a distant memory.

The elephant used to be a symbol of Republicans and the political right, which embrace and endorse hunters, whether it is justified or not. It will now take the political left to save the noble elephant.

Elliott Abosh

Brighton Beach

Muslims v. Christians

To the editor,

The uproar over Donald Trump’s idea to ban Muslims into America until we straighten things out here amazes me because I don’t remember any uproar over the fact that Syrian Christians are not allowed to enter the U.S.

Christians are being killed and raped, including children, and beheaded and tortured, but the Obama administration ruled they aren’t welcome here only because it’s the militias carrying out these atrocities and not the Syrian government. Are Muslims lives more important than Christian lives? Seems that way, according to our leader.

Peter G. Orsi

Brooklyn

‘Nice’ Muslims

To the editor,

On December 6, Muslim congregants from the Bensonhurst area banded together to host a blood drive honoring the victims of various terror attacks, under a campaign titled Muslims for Life. The families of those who lost their lives in the recent San Bernadino shooting, as well as the Paris attacks, have faced an immense amount of grief, and my thoughts and prayers are with them. However those who lost their lives and their families weren’t the only victims, there were many others wounded.

With the rise of terrorism around the world and the radicalization of Muslim youth throughout the country, there needs to be action taken. Many opinion-makers will call for restrictions, detentions, and aggressive measures; all this simply does is further fuel Islamophobia and marginalize more people to the fringe away from moderate ideals.

American psychologist Abraham Maslow identifies five basic needs that must be met which serve as the motivation behind every action a person undertakes. These needs are separated into deficit and growth needs. Deficit needs are those that must be fulfilled first before moving on to the next step, and these are needs that solicit the most visceral response in terms of extreme actions taken in order to fulfill them. The need in particular, is the need for love and belonging. Maslow identifies the need for belonging as finding a community of like-minded individuals that share and respect your thoughts and ideas. Throughout the world, we are seeing a shift away from tolerance and towards typifying individuals based on grossly vague factors of classification. As society gravitates away from tolerance in a misguided effort to ensure public safety, radical militant groups such as the Islamic State seek to fill this need by offering community, support, and even jobs. The Islamic State is creating a group of individuals who may identify as Muslim in name, but join only to fulfill basic needs that are the intrinsic motivation behind ensuring their mental sanity. In filling this need, the Islamic State is creating a cloud of disillusion around the entire religion of Islam and vilifying Muslims everywhere.

So in the face of all this tension, what can Muslims do to combat the maligned religion they are now living under? Muslims in my congregation have come together to honor the victims of these tragedies by holding a blood drive. We launched a nationwide campaign in 2010 which aims at collecting pints of blood so that when a tragedy takes place and the wounded are rushed to hospitals, blood is available and lives are saved. Following the 9-11 attacks, the city’s area hospitals were inundated with thousands of patients with various injuries ranging from smoke inhalation to massive blood loss.

The tri-state area saw a large shortage of blood units and in the last few years with crime on the rise, the need for blood units has shot up. Blood drives like this are just one way to ensure that those whose lives are hanging on by a thread receive the blood they need before it’s too late.

As a testament to the success of this peaceful event, Assemblyman William Colton (D-Bensonhurst) visited us and engaged in a healthy dialogue about tolerance and the importance of community events that bring people together for a mission of peace. Assemblyman Colton commended us on our blood drive and even donated blood himself. Other local neighbors who came in to donate blood were surprised that a local mosque would be doing something so noble. One donor commented that he passed by this mosque almost every day, but he never would have thought that the people who come here are so nice and care about others, and that he was glad to see something positive coming from Muslims.

Comments like this are exactly why dispelling Islamophobic ideas through peaceful activities that engage the entire community are important in combating extremism. The only effective measure to combat radicalization is through active dialogue and service to humanity.

Absar Alam

Bensonhurst

Islamic State

To the editor,

While I agree with President Obama that guns should not be in the hands of people on restricted flying lists, I take exception to his statement that the Islamic State began to evolve several years ago. If this were the case, why did he say last year that he didn’t have a plan to deal with them?

Ed Greenspan

Sheepshead Bay

•••

To the editor,

I frequently hear the word “inspire” in reference to persons joining the Islamic State, as having been “inspired” to join this group. It seems to me that “inspire” is a word that should be used as “inspired by a great piece of literature, a great musical composition, or an historical figure,” but to use this word in reference to a bunch of thugs like the Islamic State puts it, in my mind, totally out of context. The proper word to use should be “corrupt.”

Anything to do with the Islamic State can only be corrupt. The fools that join this terror group have been corrupted. Eliminate the word “inspire” when referring to the Islamic State and substitute it with “corrupt.”

S. Loeb

Coney Island

•••

To the editor,

After all the human lives taken by the Islamic State, I decided I needed to see something positive that would cheer me up — like watching “Woodstock” the movie. The 1969 concert was one of the greatest, non-violent gatherings ever and young people spent three days through heavy thunderstorms to listen to music.

The original crowd was 250,000, but swelled to 500,000, making it a totally free concert. Many were against the Vietnam War and tired of learning of the killing of civilians. Sounds familiar, doesn’t it? How a large group of people all coming from different backgrounds united in peace is a lesson worth reminding ourselves again.

Solomon Rafelowsky

Brighton Beach

Frankly, Jerome

To the editor,

Jerome Frank seems to think I favor the upper one percent of Americans that achieved their wealth through hard work and a drive to do better (“Income inequality,” Sound off to the Editor, Oct. 16).

Maybe in his case, his attitude and the attitude of so many people who bemoan the fact that they are not rich are self-repressing them to the lower rungs of society.

My family emigrated from Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, and other European states prior to 1900. Nothing was handed to them on a silver platter. They knew that to succeed in the new land, they had to learn its language and get together, getting their hands dirty, to scratch a living out of whatever they chose to do.

I pride myself, in some little way, on championing the rights of the workers, as I once was a vice president in a local union. During my tenure I learned a lot of the so-called one percent versus the 99 percenters. I saw how the different attitudes of the workers determined how far they progressed or regressed through the ranks. Those individuals with a sense of drive and determination climbed the ladder of success, ultimately leaving the ranks for management positions. Those with an attitude, a socialist-communist attitude of I-deserve-everything, were always in trouble with the boss, calling upon me and others in the union to help bail them out.

I invite Jerome to learn the true history of his favored socialist parties and understand that even with them, there was an upper one-percent-plus crust of political hacks enjoying a very good living while the people, under their tutelage, were the true working “slaves of the state.”

Capitalism ain’t perfect, but at least under its reign and our hard-fought-for-and-won American freedoms, one has a chance to stand up, excel, and achieve a higher income and attitude status.

Robert W. Lobenstein

Marine Park

Two-fare drone

To the editor,

The proposal by state Sen. Marty Golden (R-Bay Ridge) to offer two free transfers for those who have to ride two buses before boarding a subway is wishful thinking. People who moved to Bay Ridge, Dyker Heights, Bensonhurst, Marine Park, Gerritsen Beach and Gravesend — areas represented by Golden — knew full well that they would be living in a two-fare (bus to subway) and sometimes three-fare (bus to bus to subway) zone with longer commutes to and from work.

Metropolitan Transportation Authority services continue to be one of the best bargains in town. Since the 1950s, the average cost of riding either the bus, subway or commuter rail has gone up at a lower rate than either the consumer price index or inflation. The MetroCard, introduced in 1996, affords a free transfer between bus and subway. Prior to this, riders had to pay two full fares. Purchasing either a weekly or monthly pass further reduces the cost per ride. Many employers offer transit checks, which pay even more of the costs.

For years, local politicians would stir the pot on this issue. Now the latest cause is the cost for those handful of people out of several million daily riders who have to pay two fares versus one. An overwhelming majority can afford and already purchase either a weekly or monthly unlimited MetroCard, which makes the “double fare” issue moot.

Residents, taxpayers, and commuters in Golden’s district would be better off if he worried more about how the State Legislature will find the $8 billion Gov. Cuomo promised to bridge the $8.3 billion shortfall in the Metropolitan Transportation Authority-proposed $28 billion, five-year capital plan when they reconvene in January.

It all comes down to the availability of increased funding for additional transportation service to serve residents of two fare zones in the outer boroughs. Operating subsidies are required to increase the level of service and reduce the amount of time one waits for a bus on existing routes. Same for adding more off-peak, late night and weekend service.

Larry Penner

Great Neck, N.Y.

Tarnished Silver

To the editor,

First Shelly, then Skelos, then others. So our dear New York State democratic leader, Shelly Silver, has been convicted on all counts of bribery and other misdeeds of directing clients’ money to his own pockets. Shelly lamented in his defense that it is standard practice by all legislators in Albany to do what he did.

A few months ago the State Senate refused to fund an expansion of jails. It was sad to hear that, as the good citizens of New York are eagerly waiting to hear about the next round of indictments and convictions of crooked politicians who infest Albany. Their next stop should be a few years in this fine state’s overcrowded jails.

Robert W. Lobenstein

Marine Park

Sounding off

To the editor,

I respect About Donald Trump as a business man — he provides jobs to millions of people and donates to charity — and I like lots of things he has said. He has a way of being both well spoken and blunt, but I wish he would re-phrase some of his critiques. He will never become president. I, a regular Joe, have always felt more comfortable voting for a candidate who’s already in office, but what scares me is the thought of any American voting for Hillary Clinton.

Poor America! It really is all about “where you live” for me. I started noticing a change in Brooklyn in 1988 when mindless, scribbly-scrawl graffiti started to appear across the borough. Then in 1994, the Brooklyn I knew started fading with the arrival of illegal immigrants on 18th Avenue lining up on the corners and in front of stores, the Russians, and others with a victim mentality. Instead of being grateful to be out of their third world hell holes, they immediately started to rip off the system and take advantage.

The horror still continues, with shroud-headed-veiled-face-burqa-covering women and men who live in the 7th century coming here. I, as an American, completely do not share their antiquated, woman-hating, woman-abusing existence. In 100 or 200 years from now, America will be just another Yemen, Afghanistan, Syria, P, the Congo, Nigeria, etc.

God Bless and protect America from politicians who don’t know what the hell is going on because they like their cushy, perks-filled jobs and must get the vote to stay in office. Fourteen years after 9-11 the border south of us is not totally secure because we don’t want to offend anyone. Some are even suggesting that we shouldn’t have any borders — stupid and ignorant! I don’t recognize where I live anymore. Illegal immigrants are getting government aid and free health care, while our veterans and 9-11 first responders are still having to battle the red tape to get health care. It’s backward and disturbing. Who is in charge of this? God help America.

Sue Smith

Bensonhurst

*****ED GREENSPAN LETTERS****

Mitt’s a hit

To the editor,

Given the current crop of Republican presidential candidates for 2016, a new “three Rs” should be in vogue — “Run, Romney, Run.” Millions of voters now realize the mistake that was made in 2012, and many will cross party lines and vote for him. Why not? Richard Nixon came back from defeat in 1960 to win the presidency in 1968.

Ed Greenspan

Sheepshead Bay

Classroom trenches

To the editor,

As Warner Wolfe used to say, “Let’s Go to the Videotape,” when he would want something investigated further. Similarly let’s go to the school records of violent criminals, or better yet, do something with them in their formative years so that they don’t resort to such violence. If you opened the school records, you would see evidence of cutting class, constantly disrupting the class, roaming through the hallways, cursing, screaming, fighting, and causing all sorts of mayhem.

The city’s school system has failed these students and others by their complete refusal to deal with disruptive youth. As a result, the latter become more emboldened with each passing year, and their deviant behavior worsens until an innocent life is lost.

We keep such students in regular classes if the parent refuses to sign for special placement. As a result, chaos results as teachers desperately try to keep order with burgeoning class sizes. When are we going to face this problem head on and not keep sweeping it under the rug? This is not a racist problem. Disruptive pupils come in all races, religions and all backgrounds.

Empty out the regional and district offices and get teachers back in the classroom. We need more psychologists and psychiatrists in the schools. Less suspensions will not solve anything.

So-called staff development is a complete joke and everyone knows it. Let all the militants, ultra liberals and critics of teachers get themselves teacher licenses and get a taste of what it is like in the trenches.

Ed Greenspan

Sheepshead Bay

‘Demagogue’ Donald

To the editor,

It has become apparent to me that Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump would be absolutely perfect in still another remake of the great film, “All the King’s Men.” After all, as demagogue Willie Stark, Broderick Crawford received a well-deserved, best-actor Oscar. Trump could easily pass that, if not do even better in the part. He gives new meaning to the term demagoguery. Hollywood should definitely take notice.

Ed Greenspan

Sheepshead Bay

Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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