Sections

Longtime Greenpoint committeewoman fending off attacks she’s a no-show

Brooklyn Daily
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Greenpoint Democratic district leader Linda Minucci has held the position for as long as her upstart challenger has been alive.

But some politicos say she hasn’t been putting in the time in and around the district and is instead notably absent from the community she’s supposed to be serving.

“I never see her at any of the community board meetings in Greenpoint, or any of the other community meetings that happen weekly here in Greenpoint,” said male district leader Nick Rizzo, who is a member of the New Kings Democrats — the group backing Minucci’s 32-year-old challenger Emily Gallagher.

Republicans and Democrats each field two such leaders per assembly district — one male and one female.

The unpaid, party posts are primarily responsible for staffing polling sites and party get-out-the-vote efforts on election days.

Minucci has been the 50th Assembly District leader since 1984, and Rizzo won the male district leader role in 2014 — but he says he’s the only half of the duo putting in the work.

“I do way more than half of it,” he said.

But another Democratic insider defended Minucci’s record, saying every politician gets flack for the one meeting they don’t show up to — regardless of how many they attend.

“If you go to 100 meetings, it’s the 101st that you don’t make, you’re always faulted for not being there,” the source said, adding that Minucci has been active in battles against homeless shelters in Greenpoint Hospital and long advocated for district subway riders.

The Brooklyn Paper stopped short of endorsing her in 2010, but did note in an election guide that she did her job well.

A local blogger’s 2011 post suggests Minucci only made herself visible when it was politically expedient.

“I have lived in Greenpoint for 11 years, attended various and sundry community meetings and have never — ever — seen hide nor hair of this woman until last night,” wrote author of popular blog New York S-----. “Maybe I’m dotty or when there’s a genuine Greenpoint auto de fé in effect everyone joins in the fun.”

And Minucci has also faced years of accusations that she does not actually live within the district — but in New Jersey.

Having to defend her residency is nothing new — 2010 challenger Kate Zidar harped on her about it, Minucci said. “She was screaming at me, ‘You live in New Jersey!’” according to Minucci, who said she lives on Newell Street in Greenpoint. “Every time somebody runs against me they come up with this, and it’s not true.”

Minucci cut short our conversation before we could get additional comments on accusations levied at her.

• • •

Meanwhile in Southern Brooklyn, 46th Assembly District male Democratic district leader Mark Davidovich has announced he will not seek another term.

The longtime committeeman has opted to step aside and spend more time with his family, he said.

Davidovich’s bowing out clears the way for Councilman Mark Treyger (D–Coney Island) and Bay Ridge politico Chris McCreight to duke it out in the Sept. 13 primary, which will decide the district leader race.

The contest is but one matchup in what appears to be a larger power struggle over the Coney Island-to-Bay Ridge district.

Assemblywoman Pam Harris (D–Coney Island) — a Treyger ally — is defending her seat against Kate Cucco, who is also a member of the Bay Ridge Democrats along with McCreight.

Ridge political insiders have had a grudge against Harris ever since she snatched the party’s nomination from Cucco ahead of last year’s special election.

The pair will also meet in the September primary.

Reach reporter Julianne Cuba at (718) 260–4577 or by e-mail at jcuba@cnglocal.com. Follow her on Twitter @julcuba.
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:


Reasonable discourse

Comments closed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Keep it local!

Stay in touch with your community. Subscribe to our free newsletter: