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Verrazano-Narrows Bridge no longer accepting cash payments

Cashed out: The city rolled out cashless tolling on the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge on July 8.
Brooklyn Paper
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The city rolled out cashless tolling on the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge for smoother commutes starting July 8. The span joined six other city bridges that have eliminated toll booths as part of Gov. Cuomo’s cashless initiative, and swapped singles for sensors that scan and charge drivers through their license plates. Here’s what Rock-bound drivers should know about the change:

How does cashless tolling work?

Drivers can zoom across the bridge without dealing with toll booths, toll barriers, or dedicated toll lanes. Instead, cameras and sensors suspended over the highway will automatically charge drivers by reading their license plates, and then mailing a $17 bill per trip to the registered owner.

How does this affect E-Z Pass users?

Nothing changes for E-Z Pass customers. Vehicles with the electronic tolling gizmo will continue to be automatically charged the discounted rate of $11.52 or $5.20 for Staten Island residents. But if an E-Z Pass tag is not mounted on a windshield or is not scanned properly, cameras will capture an image of motorist’s plates and if the vehicle is registered with the service, the toll will post to the driver’s account.

How can I pay my bill?

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority will mail motorists a bill in approximately 30 days, or drivers can use the “pay toll now” option on the Tolls by Mail website: www.tollsbymailny.com.

What happens if I don’t pay my bill?

Customers who dodge their initial bill will be slapped with an overdue bill. If they still fail to cough up the dough, they will receive a notice of violation carrying a fine of $100. After three such orders, the vehicle’s registration will be suspended. Delinquent drivers would also run the risk of being pursued in court.

— Caroline Spivack

Reach reporter Caroline Spivack at cspivack@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2523. Follow her on Twitter @carolinespivack.
Posted 10:31 am, July 13, 2017
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Reasonable discourse

Carlo Trigiani from Brooklyn Heights says:
Will bills be sent to out-of-state license addresses? Can people who live in New York but have Pennsylvania plates have a New York EZ Pass? Perhaps a higher out-of-state rate would help crack down on registration/insurance fraud. 20% of my New York neighbors drive with out-of-state plates.
July 13, 2017, 9:05 am
Pedro Valdez Rivera Jr. from BS, BK, NY, US says:
More cashless tolls = More motorized vehicles = More traffic speeds = More MTA revenue. Meanwhile, Authoritarianism, bureaucracy, corruption, dysfunction, mismanagement, underinvestment and waste: Those are the things that I will say about Governor Crony and his MTA, as well as Mayor de Crony and his DOT.
July 13, 2017, 9:21 am
Tyler from pps says:
Carlo --
Anyone can get an EZ Pass from any state that issues them. Before Massachusetts switched to EZ Pass, several members of my family had both a New York EZ Pass and the Massachusetts ("Fast Pass"?? I forget) transponder.

What would be interesting is if they allow illegal/fraudulent drivers to get the "commuter" discounts!! You have to prove your home address. Can you give a Staten Island address, a North Carolina plate number... and still get the Staten Island Bridges discount rate?! I really hope not.

Also -- I wish they would just start ticketing the out-of-state license plates. If they can prove they were "just visiting," great. But it becomes harder to say that after the 10th ticket in 10 months -- not to mention the Brooklyn car dealership labels make it all a little suspect, no?

But hey -- nothing wrong with insurance fraud, right?
July 13, 2017, 10:10 am
receipts? from NYC says:
Where's the receipt that's required to be provided upon purchase? It is unlawful not to provide a receipt. So who do we go to complain to if our own government is breaking the law?

And how does one keep track of this? I get it, it doesn't matter. Just pay what we bill you or else. After all, you never had a say in government other than to scream and yell about it.

The real question is why do we put up with a system where we surrender our power to a government. They are suppose to be working for us, to carry out the wishes of the people, not doing the thinking for us and taking our right to think and decide for ourselves away.

Power to the people!
July 13, 2017, 11:08 am
Tyler from pps says:
"They are suppose to be working for us, to carry out the wishes of the people"

More efficient processes *are* the wishes of the people. Sucks you still need to operate with a system of cash and receipts. The vast majority have moved on with reality.

"And how does one keep track of this?" Really?
July 13, 2017, 11:41 am
Henry Ford from Bay Ridge says:
It's all anecdotal, but I am hearing stories of people getting $50 fines from ezpass for not having the transponder registered to the correct license plates, since cashless tolling was introduced.
July 13, 2017, 12:08 pm
Tyler from pps says:
Good -- they are supposed to match. The old system was transponder only... now there are license plate readers with a computer trying to match what's on file. Keep the fines pouring in!

(The rules aren't hard to follow.)
July 13, 2017, 1:54 pm
Henry Ford from Bay Ridge says:
I still had my ezpass registered to a car that's long gone, until the first time I went through the cashless toll at the Battery Tunnel, the lightbulb went off in my head, and I updated the information. I wasn't scamming any sort of discount, just laziness on my part. Hopefully, some folks reading this go update their tags asap.
July 13, 2017, 2:16 pm
Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
This isn't new to me, because I have already seen something like this on the TZB, which going to be the case for the new one as well, though I still feel that the tolls should have been removed once the bonds for building that bridge were paid off as it was originally supposed to be.
July 13, 2017, 3:10 pm
Tyler from pps says:
Henry --

That's fair and it's a good public service announcement -- don't be lazy. You get a new car, update everything related to your car. However, there are PLENTY of people scamming.

I wonder if the plate reader computers are fast enough to flag invalid/illegal/fraudulent plates at one end or a tunnel or bridge, so the police can snag them at the other end?
July 13, 2017, 5:16 pm
Henry Ford from Bay Ridge says:
Again, it's second hand information, but from I've been told, most of the reason for the state police hanging around cashless tolling points is the ability to catch people driving with suspended licenses/plates. If true, that will add years to the average lifespan of everyone, including drivers.
July 13, 2017, 8:51 pm
Rob Moses from Randalls Island says:
Because bicycles are toys and don't have license plates.

Or are bicycles vehicles that should be tolled?
July 14, 2017, 8:46 am
clean rides should be toll free from the boroughs says:
If you drive anything emission free, you should ride toll free.

AEV's (all electric vehicles), non-fueled bikes, ect, should not have to pay tolls as a means to promote clean transportation. The technology's out there and we need to incentivise it's use.

Those that continue to emit carbons should do the heavy lifting until they see the light, and so we can all keep seeing the light!
July 14, 2017, 9:38 am
Rob Moses from Randalls Island says:
Any bike rider huffing and puffing up the ramp to the bridge is emitting CO2.

AEV's emit CO2 not at the tail pipe but at the power plant, unless it is coming from a nuke plant.

CO2 is a trace gas. Less than 1% of the air you breathe.

Any guess as to the biggest emitter of CO2? It's the Pacific Ocean.
July 14, 2017, 11:28 am
Toonie from Staten Island says:
This is terrible! I work in a toll booth on the bridge, if no pays in cash, we won't get any tips anymore! Who's gonna compensate us for lost tip revenue?!?!!!
July 15, 2017, 7:56 am
Lynn from Bellmore N.Y. says:
Just something to think about:

1) If the Battery in the EZ pass transponder is not working, who is responsible for the FINE in the toll booth free MTA (TBTA)?

2) How would you know if your TAG is not working?
Before tollbooth free zone...
The toll arm (gate) would not go up and officer would let you know you need a new pass.
Nov. 6, 2017, 11:10 pm
Joe from Queens says:
If the Verrazano is now cashless why does the bill come as a "Notice of Violation" - like I was trying not to pay it? It also indicates that the administrative fee ($50!) is waived because of a first violation. This implies subsequent "violations" will be hit.

Here's the rub...it's cashless - there's no one to take my toll. But the notification comes across like a violation took place. Am I supposed to get an EZ Pass for the one or two times a year I cross it?
Jan. 2, 2018, 7:38 pm
Robyn M. from SA, Texas says:
Sucks for visitors in rent cars. Going to receive a nice fine from my car rental company.
July 5, 2018, 7:29 am
Jack from staten island says:
My uncle drives his car to NY and cross Staten Island bridge,how to pay toll if the car register in Canada?How can I get the biil and pay for it?
Aug. 9, 2018, 6:11 pm

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