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Give these Innovators a Yard!

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Vinegar Hill

Three cheers to Brooklyn Historical Society and Brooklyn Navy Yard’s Teen Innovators. The group was recognized as one of the Best Youth Programs in the Country with a 2017 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award.

Elected officials, Teen Innovators, local business owners, and educators joined Deborah Schwartz, president Brooklyn Historical Society; Assemblyman Joseph Lentol (D-Williamsburg); Congresswoman Nydia Velázquez, (D-Vinegar Hill); David Ehrenberg, president and chief executive officer, Brooklyn Navy Yard Development Corporation; Tracy Cook Person, co-founder, Teen Innovators; Emily Potter-Ndiaye, co-founder, Teen Innovators and director of education, Brooklyn Historical Society; Shirley Brown Alleyne, manager of Teaching and Learning Pre K-to-5, Brooklyn Historical Society; and Emma Bannister, Teen Innovator, to celebrate this auspicious moment on Nov. 20 at Bldg. 92.

Teen Innovators is an after school program and was one of 12 organizations nationwide to receive the award — the highest honor of its sort in the country.

Through a year-long humanities curriculum that focuses on the history of work in the Brooklyn Navy Yard, Teen Innovators teaches job readiness skills such as interview techniques and resume writing. The program culminates in paid internships with businesses operating in the Navy Yard. Students hail from Title I schools and live in communities surrounding the Yard.

Brooklyn Navy Yard [63 Flushing Ave. in Vinegar Hill; (718) 907–5932 www.brooklynnavyyard.org]

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Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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