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A bicycle built for celebration

Sukkah mobile: Rabbi Menashe Wolf gave Chabad of Park Slope’s pedal-powered sukkah a test drive on Friday, before debuting it on local streets for the week-long holiday that kicked off on Sunday.
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Park Slope

Yeah, it’s the super SukkahBike ride. Thanks to the genius of Rabbi Menashe Wolf, of Chabad of Park Slope, the sukkah shack is coming to you.

Rabbi Wolf decided to take to the streets to share in the celebration of Sukkot, a seven-day holiday beginning on Sept. 23 and ending on Sept. 30.

“Having access to a Sukkah can be a challenge in Park Slope where most people don’t have a backyard or outdoor space,” said Rabbi Wolf. “Our idea was to make the sukkah as accessible as possible to everyone.”

The SukkahBike, a temporary structure covered by vegetation or bamboo that requires a space open to the skies, takes the place of the customary lean-to where you shake the lulav and the etrog, and have a bite to eat.

The bike is scheduled to ride around the streets and park at busy areas, including Grand Army Plaza, Prospect Park, Seventh Avenue, and Fifth Avenue through Sept. 30. A light snack will be available at all times.

Follow the bike for updates on location and times on Facebook at www.facebook.com/events/2298486856847369.

Chabad of Park Slope [70 Prospect Park West, in Park Slope, (718) 832–6400].

Flatbush

Save the date

“Revival,” a folk-rock show about love and justice, premiers at B’ShERT.

Full of wisdom and child participation, the musical features an original story driven by the music of Kristen Plylar-Moore and performed by a small ensemble of singers and instrumentalists. Rooted largely in Hebrew biblical texts, the themes expressed are of love and justice, and envisions a world grounded in compassion and dignity.

“Revival” at Beth Shalom v’Emeth Reform Temple (B’ShERT) [83 Marlborough Rd. in Flatbush, (718) 282–1596] on Sept. 29 at 3 pm. Tickets are $10 for temple members, $15 for non-members, with free admission for kids under 13. A light Israeli-style lunch prior to the show is available — free for members and $5 for non-members.

For tickets call the temple office, or visit www.RevivalTheShow.com/events/.

Bushwick

‘Zero’ success!

Let’s put out the recycled welcomed mat to Precycle, the first “Zero-Waste” shopping outlet in our borough, scheduled to open later this year.

The store offers customers a way to reduce plastic consumption by offering food without packaging.

The breakthrough eco-friendly organic facility is the first “Zero-Waste” shopping outlet in the northeast region of the United States.

“Plastic can take hundreds of years to decompose. Worse, when plastic is disposed on landfills, the toxic chemicals from it can poison the ground and leach into nearby bodies of water,” said Katerina Bogatireva, founder of Precycle.

Here’s how it works: Precycle aims to address the growing problem of plastic pollution by empowering customers to reduce food and packaging waste by making different, yet still convenient, choices. More than simply bulk purchasing, the store will sell fresh local produce without packaging, while also working up in its own supply chain to dramatically reduce and in most cases eliminate plastic and other waste. Customers bring their own containers to procure food from the store. If needed, Precycle will supply its own reusable containers.

“The demand for new plastic production, and plastic waste that finds its way into our environment is largely influenced by the constant use of plastic in our daily lives,” she concluded.

Keep your eyes on this column to find out when Precycle is opening.

Precycle (321 Starr St. in Bushwick, www.precyclenyc.com).

Read Standing O every Thursday on BrooklynDaily.com!
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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