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Schizophrenia drug

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Imagine going through the day without the ability to concentrate and focus on the things you enjoy and important tasks that you need to complete. Think what it would be like, struggling to remember what you just talked about or learned a short time ago. Consider how you would feel if you couldn’t even accomplish simple tasks, such as making a phone call, grocery shopping or scheduling an appointment.

We all have challenging moments…but for people suffering from schizophrenia these frustrations are a way of life, virtually every day. People with schizophrenia struggle to concentrate, remember and learn. These deficits associated with the thinking process are called cognitive impairments, making it difficult to accomplish the demands of everyday life, both big and small.

Managing the demands of daily life is made easier when individuals with schizophrenia maintain a stable regimen of medication — even more so for those with trusted family members or caregivers to help oversee the individual’s personal affairs and coordinate care. Despite the challenges, most people with schizophrenia and their caregivers are searching for a better quality of life.

Fortunately, there is hope, thanks to a new investigational drug research study now underway in Brooklyn. The primary goal of this study is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of an investigational drug in improving cognitive functioning for people with schizophrenia, using a new evaluation tool called MATRICS (Measurement and Treatment Research to Improve Cognition in Schizophrenia).

This study is unique because participants are not required to change their already-stable medication regimen. Rather, the new investigational medication is added to their currently established treatment.

Candidates for this study must be 18 to 65 years old, diagnosed with schizophrenia at or before age 35 and currently taking one of five medications for schizophrenia which include olanzapine, risperidon­e/paliperi­done, quetiapine or aripiprazole.

Participants must also be considered outpatient (living in the community). Qualified study participants will receive all investigational medication and study-related care at no cost, and may also receive compensation for travel.

Miranda Chakos, MD of SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 450 Clarkson Avenue, seeks participants for this new study. If you or someone you know suffers from schizophrenia, call 888-988-6736.

Further details about the study are also available at www.cognitivestudy.com.

Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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