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Has the city gone too far with the Prospect Park West bike lane?

for The Brooklyn Paper
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The city is about to begin construction of a controversial two-way bike lane on Prospect Park West. Supporters, like Paul Steely White of Transportation Alternatives, say that the lane will finally give bikers a way to legally travel north in Park Slope, but also slow down car traffic on Prospect Park West because the bike path will require the elimination of one of the road’s three car lanes. Opponents, including many residents of the strip, say that squeezing Prospect Park West from three lanes to two will make traffic worse — and besides, Prospect Park already provides ample routes for cyclists. It’s a debate that has riven Park Slope — and served as a microcosm for bike lane debates citywide. Here’s how two experts — pro and con — see it.

Updated 10:50 am, May 5, 2010
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Reasonable discourse

Pooter from Brooklyn heights says:
To answer your question : No
May 5, 2010, 8:56 am
Eric McClure from Park Slope says:
Go back and look at the "debate" over the 9th Street road diet three years ago -- same warnings of apocalyptic developments caused by traffic calming. None of which, of course, materialized. This redesign will make Prospect Park West safer, calmer and better for everyone: pedestrians, cyclists, drivers and residents.
May 5, 2010, 9:25 am
Marc from Windsor Terrace says:
I have lived by the park all of my life and have had to deal with the traffic on Prospect Park West as a bus rider, pedestrian, bicyclist, and pedestrian. I strongly support the City's proposal for a separated bike lane. As currently configured, PPW is a dangerous speedway. Cars routinely go 45 MPH. When I drive the speed limit, I am passed on the left and right by selfish drivers who think they have the right to set their own speed limits. When I am walking, I have to dodge crazy drivers coming from Grand Army Plaza and illegal bike riders on the sidewalk heading towards GAP.

Eighth Avenue, which has similar traffic volume to PPW, is fine with two traffic lanes. PPW past Bartel-Pritchard Square and Prospect Park Southwest both have one traffic lane each leading from the square. For those who think this is a bad idea, go out for a few days and count the speeders, the reckless drivers, the wrong-way bikers, and the overall traffic volume and you won't think PPW needs three wild lanes for cars.
May 9, 2010, 2:16 pm
Steven Rosenberg from Park Slope says:
Maybe PPW isn't idea for cyclists, but on balance, I would have to agree with the Brooklyn Paper's editorial on this proposal.

In other words, if you can't handle PPW as a cyclist, why not ride in the Park? Moreover, why not focus on making the Park safe for cyclists during those hours (rush hour) when cars and bikes are riding together.
May 11, 2010, 8:48 pm
Jerome from Park Slope says:
Well it looks like the yups got their way. Shutting down an entire lane of traffic on PPW and resulting in the loss of 22 parking spots is pretty bad, but all that really matters is that the tens of thousands of transplanted suburban Joshes and Megans that woke up one day and suddenly decided to make their pilgrimage here to Park Slope will now have yet one more way to loll around the neighborhood and kill time between the farmer's market and jug band practice.
May 24, 2010, 5:06 pm
I Killed Josh! from PPW says:
You know what...I hate this idea...what a waste of money and I promise all you chruchy bikelane dickheads that I will be out there to block this bull—— with my car.....also I encourage everyone to double park in the bike lane and throw garbage, especially rusty nails into it too.

These binkey binklanes are $100%$ pandering to filthy mentally defective yups who need those training wheels...if you don't believee me go here:

http://www.nycbikemaps.com/maps/brooklyn-bike-map/

Its amazing to me that ALL the bikelanes on this map are in gentrified, yuppie neighborhoods...LOOOOOK for yourself.....

Are they that helpless that they can't ride in Prospect Park???? geeez......
May 24, 2010, 5:19 pm
Yuppie Scum from Park Slope says:
So, as I suspected, this is really not about bikes at all, but about hawd cawh Brooklyn people who hate outsiders moving into their neighborhoods, pushing up property values, and making the old-timers rich for no reason. You sound like my landlords who hate newcomers but have no problem taking their money. Move to Long Island if you want to be backwards and shop at the mall in your SUV.

If you seriously want to stop gentrification, get behind banning babies and baby strollers, or try to ruin the local schools. Parents are the people who are truly ruining New York with their screaming brats and their expectation that you will hold the door for them or give up a subway seat just because they feel entitled enough to be "pregnant." Down with everyone!!!
July 1, 2010, 9:09 am
ED from Park Slope says:
Registration fees, car insurance, and feeding the Parking Meter==less parking spaces.
No cost to cylists==more bike lanes.
May 18, 2011, 11:59 am

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