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Trial of Khalid Sheikh Mohammed

Will they start this trial already!

Brooklyn Daily
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It’s time to stop the pandering.

Khalid Sheikh Mohammed is guilty. He has admitted that he was responsible for masterminding 9-11, and has been accused of being behind the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center, Operation Bojinka plot, the failed bombing of American Airlines Flight 63 in December 2001, and a nightclub bombing in Bali, Indonesia in 2002. Now it’s time to pay the piper, yet he and his legal-beagle team have come up with every evasive tactic known to the civilized world to avoid the inevitable — a guilty verdict and a sentence of death.

To date, the bozo defendant along with fellow defendants and counsel have turned pre-trial appearances into three-ring circuses, refusing to respond to the judge’s orders, showing a wanton disrespect for the judicial process, and wasting time by filing useless motions on top of useless motions.

The latest juris–insult is the defendant’s request to wear traditional military- style clothing at his war crimes trial.

Do we care?

Who gives a flying fig in space what the heck he wears. In fact, he can wear a leotard for all I care.

I’m so sick and tired of hearing the endless litany of complaints against the U.S. government claiming how Mohammed’s rights have been violated, how the government is trying to break him down. Boohoohoo.

What about the rights of the innocent victims who were just living their lives who happened to be at the wrong place at the wrong time?

Mohammed is a very fortunate man— after languishing at Guantanamo Bay detention camp for the past eight years, he’s still getting three-squares-a-day and facing Mecca five times a day. After all that he has admitted, he should be grateful he even sees sunlight. There are 3,000 plus souls that no longer have the privilege of waking up every day, eating a meal, or praying to any god.

The latest demand, the request to wear his military-style clothes, was reported in the June 13 issue of the Post. His attorney, Army Capt. Jason Wright, has argued that he should be allowed to wear his traditional clothing because it’s his right and that denying him is just a further attempt to continue his torture treatment at the hands of the government.

“This appears to be another attempt by the U.S. government to continue one of the aims of the CIA’s now-condemned torture program as an attempt to psychologically disintegrate these so-called enemy prisoners from their individual and social personalit­ies,” Wright stated.

Excuse me? “So-called enemy prisoners?” Mohammed is a so-called enemy? Does Wright really want us to believe that this dyed-in-the-wool purveyor of death and destruction is in all actuality a paragon of virtue, and poster boy for the wrongfully imprisoned?

He is a terrorist. The crimes he committed are as heinous as you can get. Murder. He masterminded the highjacking of a plane with lots of people on board, not the highjacking of a bicycle.

I realize that Mohammed’s attorney has to do his job however don’t add insult to injury with all these stalling motions and grandstanding.

Not for Nuthin,™ but its time to get the trial done already and grant Khalid Sheikh Mohammed his fondest wish — the means to go pay a visit to 72 virgins, by sending him off with a nice last meal, a bright red blindfold, and a 21 gun salute.

Joanna DelBuono's collumn appears every Wednesday on BrooklynDaily.com. E-mail her at jdelbuono@cnglocal.com.
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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