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Muslims ho hum after Boston

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Muslim Americans need a public relations pilgrimage to repair their community’s eroding reputation and make good on their pledge of allegiance to the land of liberty — but they’re keeping any criticism of the Boston Marathon Islamo-thugs under wraps.

It was business as usual for comatose believers, who either ignored the terror attack, paid it lukewarm lip service, or flapped their anemic agendas around the memories of the dead and wounded, judging from this column’s media survey.

Park51 — the controversial mosque and Islamic community center erected near Ground Zero — cold-shouldered the bombings altogether, posting nothing on Facebook or Twitter about those who tried to destroy the great American spirit that has stood in solidarity with Muslims.

The Muslim Democratic Club of New York avoided any mention of the hateful assault on its Facebook page, while club co-founder Linda Sarsour — the Palestinian-American who has said, “In the United States, we need to come to terms with anti-Muslim bigotry, stand up to it, and unequivocally deem it unacceptable” — tweeted crassly after Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s capture, “Lets not jump to conclusions. Robbing 7-11’s doesn’t seem to be tactic of organized and trained terrorists.”

Federal authorities disagreed, charging the terror suspect with using a weapon of mass destruction in connection with the odious explosions that killed three people, injured more than 170, and later resulted in the death of a cop.

The equivocation continued.

Councilman Robert Jackson (D–Harlem), the City Council’s only Muslim member who has been more vocal about including Muslim holidays in public schools, tweeted tepidly “Keep Boston in our prayers.”

Muslim congressmen Rep. Keith Ellison (D–MN) and Rep. André Carson (D–IN) — and Mayor Mohammed Hameeduddin of Teaneck, N.J. — offered arbitrary condolences, as did TV celebrity Dr. Mehmet Oz, all of them oblivious to the responsibility of Muslims to upbraid Islam’s terrorists for creating unnecessary global instability.

No medals either for the Islamic Society of Boston Cultural Center — sister facility of the Cambridge mosque where the Tsarnaev brothers worshipped — for “encouraging” members to inform cops if they knew the suspects.

Both facilities are allegedly associated with terror-mongering creeps.

The cultural center is managed by the Muslim American Society, the American arm of the caliphate-obsessed Muslim Brotherhood, with “a curriculum that radicalizes people,” according to Americans for Peace and Tolerance. And Sheikh Yasir Qadhi, who has called Christians “spiritually filthy” and is a proud devotee of Ali al-Timimi — a preacher from Virginia serving life in prison for inciting young followers to become jihadists — is a past guest speaker at the Cambridge mosque.

Muslim American abomination over Islamo-terrorism, at a time when the Syrian regime is suspected of using chemical weapons against its fellow faithful, is non-existent.

It would be uplifting to see Muslims rally with banners that read, “Muslims will seek out and hunt down Muslim terrorists” and “Muslim terrorists have met their match in moderate Muslims.”

It would be heartening to see anti-terrorist denouncements posted outside Muslim businesses, homes, and institutions — alongside an American flag.

It would be reassuring to see volunteer Muslim patrols in Muslim-heavy communities keeping radicals — budding or otherwise — in check.

The courage to make change is a remarkably forgiving and healing force. Muslims need to dig up some. Right away.

https://twitter.com/#!/BritShavana

Read Shavana Abruzzo's column every Friday on BrooklynDaily.com. E-mail here at sabruzzo@cnglocal.com.
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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