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New app gives tour of Brooklyn Bridge

New app by builder’s descendant gives tour of Brooklyn Bridge

The Brooklyn Paper
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Finally! An app about the Brooklyn Bridge built by a descendant of the builders of the Brooklyn Bridge!

The great-great grandson of the husband-and-wife team that led the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge has joined with his wife to build a smartphone app that tells the story of Brooklyn’s most iconic structure from the time it was conceived until today.

Kristian Roebling has teamed with his wife to design “Roebling’s Brooklyn Bridge Tour” is available for $1.99 in the Apple AppStore and Google Play. It includes a map of interesting features of the Bridge, a gallery of historical archives, and a video-and-audio tour of the New York City landmark, which opened in 1883 — filling a gap that has left many iPhone users without a tool to easily learn about the Bridge.

“I was disappointed to find that my ancestor’s bridge wasn’t very effectively represented in the app world,” he wrote in an e-mail. “As a result, my wife and I set out to create a truly comprehensive, flexible and multi-functional Brooklyn Bride tour app for people who want to explore and learn about the Bridge using their phones rather than tour books or live guides.”

The tour is narrated by Roebling, a Brooklyn Bridge historian, documentary filmmaker, and trustee of the Roebling Museum, which includes some family history mixed in with the architectural details.

Like the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge, the app was made by a husband and wife team. Roebling’s spouse, Meg Pullis, provided the app design — something, Roebling said, would have “thrilled ‘Washy’ and Emily.”

Washington Roebling took over as chief engineer of the Bridge after his father, John Roebling died from lock-jaw after his foot was crushed on a while standing on a piling during the early stages of construction. As chief engineer, Washington suffered from numerous cases of the bends — called caisson disease back then — which left him mostly home bound. During that time, his wife played a major role in the Bridge’s completion.

Reach reporter Jaime Lutz at jlutz@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-8310. Follow her on Twitter @jaime_lutz.

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Reasonable discourse

sajh from Brooklyn says:
Yes, that's exactly what we need. More people on the Brooklyn bridge walking slowly and not paying attention to their surroundings.
May 29, 2013, 8:36 am
old time brooklyn from slope says:
sajh from Brooklyn says:

Yes, that's exactly what we need. More people on the Brooklyn bridge walking slowly and not paying attention to their surroundings.

-- and that is bad why????
May 29, 2013, 8:37 pm
Carolina Salguero from Red Hook says:
Fantastic news! Can't wait to try this! We at PortSide NewYork are working on such guides to Red Hook ("WaterStories") and think it is great news (and high time) that Brooklyn's great bridge have an interpretive app! Let's have more educational apps! We'd love to talk to Roebling & Pullis about working with us on ours.
May 30, 2013, 2:07 pm
Carolina Salguero from Red Hook says:
Terrific! Can't wait to try this! High time Brooklyn's bridge had historic interpretation for the mobile era. Let's have more educational apps! We are PortSide NewYork are working on explaining Red Hook's history via our WaterStories project, and see a lot of inspiration in what we read here. We'd love to see if Roebling & Pullis would like talk to us about our project.
May 30, 2013, 2:10 pm

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