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Marathon of Speeches at the Fitness Center for Arts and Tactics

Speak easy

The Brooklyn Paper
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Go to Bushwick to see experimental music, art, and now — pontificating.

A marathon session of speeches will attempt to hold an audience’s attention for the long haul, testing its endurance — and tolerance.

“I am hoping that the audience will get a little rowdy,” said organizer Miles Pflanx. “We are going to run a pool on who will start a riot.”

The idea behind the event, dubbed a Marathon of Speeches, is that it will bring back to what seems to be an ancient idea of the manifesto, of emotive, propaganda-filled discourse that calls listeners to action.

“Ideology is considered so old-hat these days,” said Pflanx. “Everything flows along the standard liberal and conservative lines. There is no more dreaming of a utopia or novelty.”

There are already more than 30 speakers signed up, and Pflanx hopes to get to 45 or 50 by the night of the event. Each speaker will have a five-minute time limit.

The speeches will include highly charged and impassioned talks, political propaganda, and brainy self-referential experiments.

One woman, who plans to marry her platonic best friend and business partner, will deliver an invective on the real meaning behind marriage.

“We are seeing a much more honest depiction of how people interact now,” said Monica Miracle, 25. “Marriage is a medium of expression.”

One speaker, Daniel Creahan, plans to give a speech about speeches themselves, and how the theatricality of speeches, like those given by Adolf Hitler, can rouse listeners to behave in horrific ways that they would not have normally.

To add another level, he plans to deliver the speech utterly dispassionately.

“The speech will break down all the techniques and I’ll be mumbling and shuffling all the way through it,” said Creahan.

If the audience needs to take a break from the heavy-handed pontificating, they can step outside to see words literally floating away as if weightless.

Jordan Johnson will be performing “Letters Take Flight,” in which he loads pre-signed pieces of papers into his Smith-Corona manual typewriter and types until he reaches the end of the page, which is attached to helium balloons, sending it off into the sky.

“The helium balloon is a metaphor for the writing,” said Johnson. “It inflates in the thought process and then it gets exposed to air and it deflates.”

Marathon of Speeches at the Fitness Center for Arts and Tactics (1196 Myrtle Ave. between Willoughby Avenue and Suydam Street in Bushwick). 8 pm, Sept. 3, free.

Reach reporter Danielle Furfaro at dfurfaro@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-2511. Follow her at twitter.com/DanielleFurfaro.
Updated 10:14 pm, July 9, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

diehipster from The Borough of K I N G S says:
More examples of talentless, grasping, out-of-place, awkward, pathetic, beta-males masquerading as artists in working class hoods.

A dweeb who will give an emotionless speech? Another douche who will tie helium balloons to paper as he types on his 'vintage' typewriter???

ART ART ART ART ART ART ART ART ART ART

LOLLLLL Thank god none of these interlopers are anywhere near REAL BROOKLYN.

(I now invite the resident Brooklyn Paper yups to tell me, with racial undertone of course, that I live in the basement of my grandmothers house which is in the middle of a gun battle and the neighborhood air is pure car exhaust.)
Aug. 30, 2013, 7:20 am
Bendrix says:
I agree. Looks like hipsters think they can spell words and string them together in artistic arrangements that equal ART. These laughing-stocks need to just give it up already. Everything they do screams LOOK AT ME. I'M A HIPSTER. LOOK AT ME.

Go ahead and call me fat, hipsters. I dare you. I look nothing like Andrew Dice Clay.
Aug. 30, 2013, 1:23 pm
SwampYankee from runined Brooklyn says:
Yikes DANIELLE, I know you are going for page views but this was so artisanal, free range, locally sourced, free range that even the usual hipster apologist could not defend these 2. I wonder what Brooklyn High School these 2 locals went to?
Aug. 30, 2013, 7:56 pm
Bendrix says:
Locals only. Everyone else go back to the hellhole you came from.
Aug. 30, 2013, 8:04 pm
SwampYankee from runined Brroklyn says:
Ethan/Chhoch/Bendrix

New character from you Ethan? I guess the irony you were pushing in your Chooch character wasn't working. So now you will try sarcasm because you "young millennials" invented sarcasm right after you invented bacon and real New Yorkers could not understand your edgy wit and you could speak to others in your kewel nabe without us locals understanding. You $150k English degree must be serving you well at your barista internship if you are trying out your writing skills in ht comments section of an article here. Nicely done. Do keep in mind not matter how much you say you are "from Brooklyn" you are not and can never be. You are simply Brooklyn based and your nasal honk will always betray you out of state origin. Like Yah!
Aug. 31, 2013, 9:15 am
Please from south slope says:
The 'nasal yup' meme is so amusing... in my neighborhood it's the locals who are nasal, whiny and abrasive as they screech at each other up and down the block or on the train.
Aug. 31, 2013, 9:56 am
Bendrix says:
SwampYankee

I guess you fat ass Baby Boomers are stuck in the 90s, when it was cool to act like Andrew Dice Clay, eh. Keep shoveling hot dogs down your throat, watching your 'roided up baseball team cheat its way to glory, and acting like a tough guy from a Scorsese movie.
Aug. 31, 2013, 2:43 pm
SwampYankee from runined Brooklyn says:
Bendrix,
I suspect you watch too much TV. You have this stereotype in your head of someone named Tony pulling Tina around by her hair wearing a wife beater. I don't eat hot dogs, I hate the yankees, and I'm smart enough to know that Andrew Silversteens Andrew dice Clay is an act. Heck, I'm not even Italian. This is why you will always be an outsider in Brooklyn. You have no clue what it is like, it's history, it's cultural diversity or off the people that live here. You will hide in your apartment with the rest of your from the scary brown people at the West Indian day parade Monday and wonder, "why can't I be accepted into Brooklyn like that?" Biggest parade in Brooklyn and all you can manage is a bunch of beardos nasally honking about artisanal bike lanes. Many of the people marching are 1st generation are are accepted as true Brooklynites, something you will never, ever be...because all you see is something Jersey Shore rip off you made up in your hear. now run along and enjoy the guy giving the speech to make people angry or the dick tying balloons to peices of paper in his typewriter. Enjoy the show and look around at all the people that are the same as you....and not from here...never will be from here you will never be FROM the place you so desperately want to be FROM just like High School...always an outsider
Aug. 31, 2013, 4:25 pm
Bendrix says:
And you will always be an ignorant rube from the Tri-State, whose perspective is no different from a redneck in rural America. You accuse me of dishing out stereotypes but your fat, Baby Boomer ass is also on a keyboard pounding out a bunch of —— day in and day out about anyone who wasn't born here. Guess what? America is a free country, thankfully not run by laws made by people with a tyrannical view of who belongs where like you possess. People who move here like to enjoy local events too, though you don't want to believe that, because it goes against your preconceived ideas of what these outsiders are like that you have such an inferiority complex toward. Your generation has basically secured its own future obsolescence, which you so pathetically project onto "hipsters." You can sense your own cultural and political extinction coming and you can't stand to see others coming up who are going to destroy the —— you guys created. The politicians you elected ran this country into the ground. Your corporations created a bunch of junk products and food and outsourced all the jobs. We wimpy, lazy Gen Xers and Millennials are going about fixing the mess your greedy, resentful generation of pampered Baby Boomers made and you can't stand to get out performed. You might snivel about people from out of state being forever unwelcome here but you're worse off in the scheme of history. The inbetween generation of pathetic Baby Boomer hippies projecting their own insecurities onto a generation who has had more of its population shipped off to war and had to come up in a recessionary economy.
Aug. 31, 2013, 7:49 pm
Scott from Park Slope says:
I can't say I'd enjoy any of these performances. There doesn't appear to be anything uplifting, challenging, or aesthetically pleasing about them. They just sound boring. But good for them for getting out and doing something. Creativity is a process. Sometimes you produce something brilliant, but more often than not you miss the mark. I applaud the courage it takes for these guys to put themselves out there despite the slings and arrows of skeptical audiences.
Sept. 1, 2013, 7:56 am
SwampYankee from ruined Brooklyn says:
Bendrix,
you are projecting again about thing you know nothing about. Politicians I elected? yup, voted for the sitting president twice and never voted for a conservative or republican above the city level and rarely then. You and the rest of the rubes mostly come from red states so who elected whom? you speak of culture in defence of a guy that ties balloons to peices of paper. My cultural ties to the city are broad and deep. As a student I took advantage of the $4 rehearsals offered by Leonard Bernstein. I have seen giants perform in this city, Van Karajan, Pavarotti, Baryshnikov Horowitz. You have a guy tying balloons to paper. Which of these will stand the test of time. You are going to fix what? I work for this city, I make things better, I, in a very small way, shape the future of this city. you talk but you do not act. cyclists do not like that they have to stop at red lights, so they go right through them. Did anybody even think to try and change the law? Nope, the nasally honk about the police being out to get them, but they don't try and change anything. you have low paying jobs, you have no benefits, you have no pensions, you have no savings, you rent in marginal places and then move further away when your financial superiors decide it's time for gentrification and they want to buy what you used to rent. Then you pack up and move further down one of the BMT lines (you will have to look up what constitutes a BMT line, a local would know). low wage jobs, no savings, no future and the only health care you will have is what the president I voted for decided to give you and your red home state bigots are trying to take away. you are just another renting rube on a bike, like all of those just like you, you will move along when the yuppies want your property. you will leave without a honk now that you have sterilized yet another neighborhood for the forces of gentrification. Thanks for nothing
Sept. 1, 2013, 8:42 am
John WAsserman from Windsor Terrace says:
Might I suggest a solution to these ongoing arguments: a game. The loser of the game shall not comment on these threads for one month. I'm sick of reading this "marlarkey" (pardon the language). This is just one mans opinion. The game can take place whenever is convenient for everyone, since I suspect everyone's reaction (if any reaction at all) will be that they "work for a living" or " I'm too busy, unlike you" and so on. Pardon the suggestion.
Sept. 2, 2013, 8:57 am

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