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Malevolent mullahs must be cracking up over WTC security breach

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“Eternal vigilance is the price of liberty,” said Wendell Phillips in 1852, his evocative words engraved in stone outside the National Archives in Washington.

The American abolitionist must be turning in his grave as our sworn enemies laugh in their fatwas over the security burp heard around the world, when a teen thrill seeker climbed to the near-top of the new World Trade Center undetected by a half-blind guard snoozing on the job.

That diabolical din you hear is the mullahs cracking up. Could there be a worse reminder that justice for 9-11 victims, whose memories are being relegated to the pits of time, is back-peddling?

It has been nearly 13 years since that sunny Tuesday on Sept. 11, 2001, when 19 Muslim terrorists hijacked four planes. They flew two into the World Trade Center, one into the Pentagon in Washington, and steered another toward the White House before heroic passengers fought them, crashing the doomed jet in a field in Shanksville, Pa.

The terrorist attacks killed nearly 3,000 people from around the world, unearthing the deep-seated hatred of our sworn enemies. Time and memory should never erase those hard facts.

Immediate, absolute redress should have been our national priority, but the mightiest nation on the planet is still scratching its arse: Ground Zero is only partially complete in an incredible travesty of duty, considering it took two years to build the Eiffel Tower, three years to construct the Titanic, and 10 years for the Suez Canal to be up and running. Shanksville still does not have a permanent memorial to the victims of Flight 93. And only Zacarias Moussaoui and Osama bin Laden’s son-in-law Sulaiman Abu Ghaith have been convicted in connection with 9-11, while five other admitted plotters — confessed mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, Walid bin Attash, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Ali Abd al-Aziz Ali, and Mustafa Ahmed al-Hawsawi — remain cushily holed up in Gitmo instead of behind bars in solitary confinement until they rot.

The lackadaisical trail can be traced to President Obama, who commemorated the 10th anniversary of the attacks with the lame assertion that our worst day was “not just about us” and to “minimize references to al-Qaeda.” Who needs enemies with leadership like that?

Sixteen-year-old Justin Casquejo was a toddler when 9-11 happened and he cannot be blamed for being a casualty of the attacks’ depreciation in subsequent years, as Americans foolishly let their guard down.

Yet he provided evil-doers with a road map when he squeezed through a foot-long crevice around the construction site, climbed the scaffolding up to the sixth floor, rode the elevator to the 88th floor, strode up the stairs to the 104th floor right past dozing guard Abdul Basher, and up to the roof where he climbed the ladder to the antenna, past two additional security checkpoints — just because he could.

If eternal vigilance is the price of liberty, then the bureaucratic bums entrusted with safeguarding the new World Trade Center — the world’s beacon of freedom — need to cough up a major refund. Oh, and that roar you hear is our sworn enemies cackling up a storm.

https://twitter.com/#!/BritShavana

Read Shavana Abruzzo's column every Friday on BrooklynDaily.com. E-mail here at sabruzzo@cnglocal.com.
Updated 11:48 am, January 16, 2019
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