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Robber makes off with $800 from occupied house

The Brooklyn Paper
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68th Precinct

Bay Ridge—Dyker Heights

Shadow money

A sneak-thief broke into a man’s 85th Street house and stole $800 on June 3 — while the victim was home, police stated.

The victim said he was taking it easy in the living room of his house between Dyker Place and Seventh Avenue around 6:30 pm, when he saw a shadow in a mirror.

He rushed to his bedroom in time to see the prowler climbing out a window, according to law enforcement sources.

No genius

Cops cuffed a geek who they say stole an Apple computer from a 66th Street store on June 3.

The suspect strolled into the store between 10th Avenue and Fort Hamilton Parkway around 2:50 pm and filched a MacBook Pro, but the store owner phoned the cops and officers arrived in time to collar the accused, officials said.

Bail doubt

A schemer duped a grandmother into doling out $4,000 on June 5 by making her think she was bailing her granddaughter out of jail, according to the authorities.

The victim, who lives between Fourth and Fifth avenues, got a call at 11 am from a mystery man claiming to be in Florida, police said.

The caller told the granny her kin was behind bars and needed $4,000 to make bail, then instructed her to purchase the sum in pre-paid debit cards and wire the money to him, which she did, cops stated.

All ears

Authorities arrested a man who they say tried to steal headphones and several other items from a drugstore on Fort Hamilton Parkway on June 2.

The suspect entered the store between 64th and 65th streets at 7:50 pm and grabbed $1,000 worth of headphones, speakers, and chewing gum before attempting to flee the store, police allege.

Trouble check

A check scammer tricked an elderly Ridge Boulevard woman into paying him $6,000 on May 30, according to cops.

The woman received a check for $6,637.66 to her home between Shore Road and Marine Avenue and promptly deposited the sum thinking it came from Publishers Clearing House, police sources said.

The victim then got a phone call directing her to withdraw $6,000.01 and send it to an address in Queens, officers stated. Soon after she dropped the money in the mail, the woman’s bank called to tell her the first check bounced, the authorities stated.

— Max Jaeger

Updated 1:38 am, June 11, 2014
Reach reporter Will Bredderman at wbredderman@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-4507.
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