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Rain delay as Barclays Center springs a leak

The Brooklyn Paper
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Things aren’t looking up: Barclays Center workers ponder the leak that stalled Tuesday night’s Nets game against the Miami Heat.

The roof was decidedly not on fire at Barclays Center on Tuesday night.

The Nets game against the Miami Heat was delayed for around 30 minutes at the tail end of the first quarter, when the roof of the two-year-old, $1 billion arena sprang a leak. A spokesman for the team said the problem stemmed from work to make a green roof up top, and that arena management has fixed it.

“The delay was caused by a water leak due to the installation of our new green roof,” he said. “We have taken all necessary steps to rectify the situation.”

Referees stopped the game with 1:47 left on the clock for the quarter when they noticed water dripping from the ceiling onto the court, near a three-point line. A crew mopped up the mess and placed a kitchen-sized trash can under the leak, then when that proved insufficient, upgraded to an outdoor trash can, keeping the game paused until the leak stopped.

Adding injury to injury, the Nets eventually lost the game 95–91.

Construction on the living rooftop started back in October, requiring three cranes to hoist materials to the top of the arena. Forest City Ratner, which built the arena and is a minority owner in the related development project formerly known as Atlantic Yards, expects the project to take about nine months, and hopes that it will help sound-proof the arena, in addition to sweetening the view for future neighbors.

The company has also experienced construction problems at the first residential tower in that project, B2. The building’s contractor Skanska sued Forest City for cost overruns associated with alleged design flaws back in September. Forest City later broke ties with Skanska.

We’re going to need a bigger bin: As the water continued to pour down, Barclays workers brought in a larger receptacle to catch it.
Who and the what now?: Nets forward Kevin Garnett wonders when it will ever end.
Updated 6:25 pm, December 22, 2014
Reach reporter Matthew Perlman at (718) 260–8310. E-mail him at mperlman@cnglocal.com. Follow him on Twitter @matthewjperlman.
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Reasonable discourse

Tal Barzilai from Pleasantville, NY says:
For some reason, I felt something like this was going to happen, but that's Ratner for you.
Dec. 17, 2014, 6:44 pm
Mom from Clinton Hill says:
Is a green roof the same as a park where kids can play?
Dec. 17, 2014, 11:10 pm
Charles from BK says:
Symbolic event for a project based in political corruption and an unconstitutional taking? I reckon so.
Dec. 18, 2014, 9:09 am
Where a hard hat when you go to the Barclay Cent from Boerum Hill says:
What do the folks at Empire State Development have to say about the leaky roof? So much for good construction....Remember there is NOBODY working at ESDC in the community affairs dept with a background in construction.
Marion Phillips - he will pray the roof doesn't leak on your head.
Joe Chan - does what ever Ken Adams tell him to and has no background in construction.
Ken Adams - puppet to Governor
Dec. 18, 2014, 5:06 pm
Jamie from Flatbush says:
Just admit this was a mistake and let the Nets go home to Jersey.
Dec. 19, 2014, 8:47 am

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