Sections

Future films: Virtual reality festival coming to Dumbo

The Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

It’s a vision of the future!

Cyber fans can get a glimpse of next-generation film-making this week in Dumbo, when the Virtual Reality Film Festival comes to town. The show’s co-founder says that the genre is so far ahead of its time, there are no words to describe it.

“Films isn’t really the right word, but we’re using it as shorthand to describe the history and lineage that we’re drawing on,” said Rene Pinnell. “We haven’t invented the right word to describe what they’re doing.”

Whatever you call it, visitors to the virtual festival must each strap on a headset for the experience. The 24 short “films,” which range from two to 20 minutes long, include a short story about farting giants, a tour through a Vincent Van Gogh-inspired landscape, and a journey to Korea’s de-militarized zone. But after each piece ends, viewers must return briefly to the real world.

“It’s kind of like an amusement park,” said Pinnell. “Each time you get to the front of the line, you get to go through the ride.”

On this ride the seats do not loop-de-loop, but they do spin in place so viewers can get a full 360-degree view of their virtual environment, he said.

Brooklyn is the ninth stop of the festival’s 10-city tour, which has included San Francisco, Portland, and Montreal. Pinnell said the show went to where the art is.

“We went to meet-up.com, and looked at which cities had the most active virtual reality meet-ups,” he said. “They track pretty closely to cities that have the most creative scenes in general.”

The festival has 18 films that travel from site to site. The Brooklyn stop also features six films from local artists, which Pinnell said are more reality-based than films from other cities.

“Brooklyn, and New York City in a broader sense, is more drawn to live action than animation,” he said.

Pinnell hopes the festival will nudge creative people into making next year’s festival bigger and better.

“Our biggest motivation for doing this festival is to celebrate these artists who are taking these first steps, but more that that, our goal is to inspire more people to become artists in virtual reality,” he said.

Kaleidoscope Virtual Reality Film Festival at 26 Bridge (26 Bridge St. between Plymouth and John streets in Dumbo, www.kvrff.com). Oct. 6, 8–11 pm. $20 ($99 VIP).

Reach Bill Roundy at broundy@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–4507.
Posted 12:00 am, October 2, 2015
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Get our stories in your inbox, free.

Like Brooklyn Paper on Facebook.

Reasonable discourse

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Don’t miss out!

Stay in touch with the stories people are talking about in your neighborhood:

Optional: Help us tailor our newsletters to you!