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Brick-wielding crook breaks into diner

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78th Precinct

Park Slope

Take out

A crook busted into and looted a Seventh Avenue diner sometime during the night of Oct. 17.

Workers reported leaving the eatery between St. Johns and Lincoln places at 11 pm, and the morning crew arrived at 5 am the next day to find a glass door busted in and a brick lying conspicuously just inside the diner.

Inside, they found the burglar had taken two cash drawers containing roughly $600, cops said.

You want it, you got it

A carjacker sped off with a man’s 2012 Toyota Camry he parked along 13th street on Oct. 17.

The victim told police that he left his four-door between Fourth and Fifth avenues at 7 am, and returned that evening to find an empty spot where his car had been.

Bad trip

Cops busted a 31-year-old man for breaking into and trashing the Second Avenue offices of a tour company on Oct. 18.

A witness told police he spotted the man inside the establishment between Sixth and Seventh streets at the odd hour of 4:51 am, and phoned up the police to make sure everything was on the up and up.

But, as the witness suspected, it turned out the man had no business being inside the Second Avenue office, and had merely let himself in to create a mess worth $1,000 in damages, cops said.

Dirty laundry

A thief broke into and ransacked a Fourth Avenue laundromat on Oct. 17.

Surveillance footage shows the thief busting into the establishment between 14th and 15th streets at 3 am by shattering a glass window and slithering inside. Once in, the crook didn’t bother trying to crack open the register, and merely grabbed the whole thing, along with the $450 it contained, cops said.

Cash withdrawal

A crook broke into a Fourth Avenue pizza shop sometime after Oct. 10, and cracked open an automated teller machine containing more than $16,000.

The pizza guy told police he left his shop between Union and President streets at 2 am, and returned four days later to find his cash disepender had been pilfered. It’s possible the crook entered through a rear door, but the thief did a good job covering his tracks, cops said.

Close call

A bike-riding bandit swiped a phone from a man’s hands on Prospect Park West on Oct. 12.

The victim told police that he was near Ninth Street at 2:20 pm when the biker swooped by and grabbed the phone. Fortunately, a good Samaritan was on hand to head off the biker, and the crook was forced to toss the phone to the ground in order to make good on his escape.

Fixed

A crook made off with a man’s fixed-gear bike he’d left in a President Street bike storage facility on Oct. 14.

The victim told police he was visiting a friend at the establishment between Nevins Street and Third Avenue at 8:50 pm and had left his bike in one of the sheds there. He wasn’t gone 10 minutes before her returned to find his bike had been pinched, cops said.

— Colin Mixson

Updated 10:17 pm, July 9, 2018
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