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Why can’t Carmine get the information he needs?

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I’m madder than a Luddite in a sewing machine factory over the fact that the tried-and-true ways of getting information just don’t work no more no matter how loud I yell into the phone.

Look, you all know the ol’ Screecher has been using the 411 to find out the phone number of local haberdasheries, Chinese restaurants, pizza joints, bakeries, and places other than gyms since before the term became the cool way of saying “information,” and I have no intention of changing my ways.

That’s why I was so upset this week when no matter how fast I spun the dial on the yellow phone in the kitchen, I couldn’t get the digits of Rite Aid on 86th Street and 15th Avenue — the one with the big parking lot — so I could check to see if the prescription that is going to keep me alive is ready, and if they have those “D” batteries I need for my flashlight in stock.

Apparently, no one no where knows the phone number of this place, even at the Phone Company, where they are supposed to know every number in the book that we used to use to boost the kids up to table level during Sunday dinner.

Now, I know what you’re thinking: “Carmine, you’re a man of great means. Why didn’t you just ask the Siri what the number was? Or better yet, why not use the Google?”

Well, I tired, but I couldn’t find Siri’s number! Does anybody out there know Siri’s phone number? And as for the Google, well, that must have slipped my mind. Good point.

All of this heartache about getting my prescription comes at a time when I want to live more than ever, especially after listening to the mayor say he wants to keep the city affordable like it was for working stiffs like me living high on the hog at the beautiful twin towers of Harway Terrace!

Who knows if that will happen, as I’m staring down the barrel 80-something, mind you! So its the little things in life I look forward to, like this year’s BWECC! awards dinner — you know, the one that is bigger than the Oscars and takes place at the beautiful El Caribe Country Club in Mill Basin.

With that in mind, here’s the write up on our Woman of the year, the outstanding principal of PS 95 in Gravesend, Janet Ndzibah (whose last name, thankfully, you’ll never find in a spelling bee!).

Born and raised in Bay Ridge, Janet always aspired to be a teacher. Some of her earliest sparks of inspiration came from the elementary school teachers she had as a student at St. Patrick’s Catholic School in Bay Ridge. Janet fulfilled her goal of becoming a teacher,immediately after graduating from State University of New Your Buffalo with her bachelor’s degree in Education, when she landed a job as a third-grade teacher at Public School 9 in Prospect Heights. During this time. While teaching there, Janet earned her master’s as a reading teacher and reading specialist for corrective reading at Hunter College.

Janet then became a teacher of Public School 13 in Rosebank, Staten Island. On the Rock, Janet was a classroom teacher, reading teacher, and literacy coach. With the support of her family, mentors and school administrators, Janet aspired to become a school leader and received her advanced post-master’s degree in school leadership from the College of Staten Island. She then became the assistant principal of Public School 13 for four and a half years.

In January 2011, Janet was named principal of Public School 95. For the past four years, Janet has proudly worked side-by-side with the dedicated and hard working assistant principals, teachers, staff, PTA, parents, and students of the Public School 95 community. As a result, Public School 95 has shown academic gains in both reading and mathematics. Together, they continue to build a collaborative professional learning community, committed to providing a rigorous and supportive learning environment for all of the 1,000 students that the school serves.

Janet considers herself so fortunate to share her life with her supportive husband, Kwesi Ndzibah. They consider their greatest accomplishments and most precious possessions to be their two beautiful children, Sierra, 10 and Maxwell, 4.

Together, they work diligently, with the love and support of their parents, family and close friends to instill the love of learning, leadership and citizenship to their children.

There is still time to make reservations to join us, contact bwecc@aol.com for info. Remember schools are closed during Presidents’ Week!

Screech at you next week!

Read Carmine's screech every Sunday on BrooklynPaper .com. E-mail him at diegovega@aol.com.
Posted 12:00 am, February 15, 2015
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