Sections

Street surfing: Internet-equipped buses hit Brooklyn streets

Hard drive: A fleet of new internet-equipped buses are coming to lines across the borough before the end of October.
Brooklyn Paper
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Talk about high-speed internet!

The buses of tomorrow hit the streets of Brooklyn last week, providing the same wireless internet access to above-ground commuters that subway straphangers have enjoyed since January.

Three new buses flush with wireless internet and digital charging ports arrived in Brooklyn as part of the initial rollout of some 86 shiny new people haulers, which will continue to be introduced at a rate of 3–5 busses per week until mid-October.

The web-surfing shuttles will serve the B4, B8, B9, B11, B16, B35, B37. B43, B61, B63, B67, B68, B69, and B70 lines.

The transit authority’s new toys are part of a $1.3 billion state investment in the city’s bus fleet, which will culminate in 2,042 new future-ready land crawlers by 2022.

The authority also plans to retrofit existing buses with the same digital-age amenities as the new shuttles, in addition to erecting partitions walling off drivers from the masses and installing security cameras that will “enhance the safety of both bus operators and passengers,” according to the governor’s office.

Additional future-tech on the horizon for Brooklyn buses includes a collision avoidance system the transit authority hopes will prevent some 1,600 buses from colliding with stuff annually by mid-2018, and digital information screens displaying route information and travel advisories planned for some 3,600 busses by 2020.

Reach reporter Colin Mixson at cmixson@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260-4505.
Posted 12:00 am, April 25, 2017
Today’s news:
Share on TwitterTweet
Share on Facebook
Subscribe

Don’t miss our updates:

Reasonable discourse

Mike from Williamsburg says:
You can tell Cuomo doesn't know anyone who has ever taken a bus, which is why he thinks the problem with the buses was that it was too hard to get online.
April 25, 2017, 7:31 am
Pedro Valdez Rivera Jr. from BS, BK, NY, US, formerly from WB, BK, NY, US says:
This is the perfect example of a "Glass Half Empty, Glass Half Full" approach: Replacing older buses is awesome, but crappy bus service with decreasing ridership numbers remains.
April 25, 2017, 9:30 am
Dave from Brooklyn says:
Bus service is absolute garbage and it's almost always faster to walk.

Perhaps fixing that would drive ridership levels up.
April 25, 2017, 10:06 am
how about clean air? from Brooklyn says:
NYC wasting our money again on pacification of the public with willy-nilly nonsense instead of focusing on clean air EV buses and the all electric BQX.

Fix the most important things first when buying new vehicles, safety & clean air.
April 25, 2017, 12:57 pm
Farrah Lewis says:
Investing in motor vehicles? Why not bicycles?
April 25, 2017, 5:39 pm
Ralph Kramden from Bensonhurst says:
Just what I need!
April 25, 2017, 9:01 pm

Enter your comment below

By submitting this comment, you agree to the following terms:

You agree that you, and not BrooklynPaper.com or its affiliates, are fully responsible for the content that you post. You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening or sexually-oriented material or any material that may violate applicable law; doing so may lead to the removal of your post and to your being permanently banned from posting to the site. You grant to BrooklynPaper.com the royalty-free, irrevocable, perpetual and fully sublicensable license to use, reproduce, modify, adapt, publish, translate, create derivative works from, distribute, perform and display such content in whole or in part world-wide and to incorporate it in other works in any form, media or technology now known or later developed.

First name
Last name
Your neighborhood
Email address
Daytime phone

Your letter must be signed and include all of the information requested above. (Only your name and neighborhood are published with the letter.) Letters should be as brief as possible; while they may discuss any topic of interest to our readers, priority will be given to letters that relate to stories covered by The Brooklyn Paper.

Letters will be edited at the sole discretion of the editor, may be published in whole or part in any media, and upon publication become the property of The Brooklyn Paper. The earlier in the week you send your letter, the better.

Don’t miss out!

Stay in touch with the stories people are talking about in your neighborhood:

Optional: Help us tailor our newsletters to you!