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Bklyn man killed on Citi Bike is service’s first fatality

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A Brooklyn Heights man died after a charter bus hit him as he rode a Citi Bike on Monday.

Columbia Heights resident Dan Hanegby, 36, was riding the bicycle on a narrow Manhattan street around 8:15 am when he swerved to avoid a parked vehicle, fell off the bike as the bus drove in the same direction beside him, and was run over by the vehicle’s rear tires, according to an NYPD spokesman.

He was rushed to the hospital, where he died two hours later.

The 52-year-old bus driver remained on the scene and was not charged, according to police.

The street — 26th Street between Seventh and Eighth avenues — is not a bus route, according to a local who said keeping large vehicles off area thoroughfares is a recurring issue.

“This bus should have never been on that street because it is not a truck route,” said Christine Berthet, the chair of Manhattan Community Board 4’s Transportation Committee. “Buses go everywhere, and trying to control them and get them on the right track is very difficult.”

It is unclear why Hanegby fell off his bicycle, but the superintendent of a building on the street told the New York Post that the bus driver did not leave much space between his vehicle and the cyclist as they traveled alongside each other.

Police officers ticketed Citi Bike riders going the wrong way on streets in the area following the collision, although there is no evidence Hanegby was violating the rules of the road when he was hit.

Hanegby, a married father of two, worked as an investment banker for Switzerland-based financial holding company Credit Suisse Group, according to his LinkedIn profile.

He was born in Tel Aviv, where he became a teen tennis star who ranked as Israel’s number one player at the age of 16, according to a report in the campus newspaper of Brown University. Hanegby transferred to the Rhode Island college as a sophomore, after moving to the U.S. to attend Binghamton University, in New York.

He served as a staff sergeant in the Israel Defense Forces for three years starting in 1999, before relocating to the U.S.

Hanegby’s death is the first fatality in 43 million trips taken by Citi Bike customers since the transit system’s 2013 rollout, according to a rep for the service who released a statement mourning his untimely tragedy.

“Together, with the City of New York, we wish to express our heartfelt condolences to the rider’s family and loved ones on this terrible tragedy,” said Citi Bike spokeswoman Dani Simons.

Hanegby’s family did not immediately return request for comment.

Reach reporter Lauren Gill at lgill@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2511. Follow her on Twitter @laurenk_gill
Posted 5:51 pm, June 14, 2017
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Reasonable discourse

Lorum Ipsum from Battery Park City says:
I hate to this because it sounds insensitive, and this is a tragedy, but...I wonder if he actually checked over his left shoulder before he swerved. Riding a bike in New York is no different to driving a car – I cycle every day – and just like being in a car, if you have to swerve (did he, did he actually have to 'swerve'?) or at least pedal around a stationary vehicle, then you look over your shoulder. If there's no time to do that – you simply brake. Because – and especially – if you're on a bike, then the chances are there probably IS a vehicle parallel to you.
June 14, 2017, 11:35 am
reads well from learning says:
Lorum Ipsum from Battery Park City,

Yes he looked, however the motorist did not use caution when passing him.

http://gothamist.com/2017/06/14/cyclist_protected_bike_lanes.php
June 14, 2017, 2:49 pm
gimme from yourz says:
bikin' iz 4 sucka mcs who likez ta getz burnt yo
June 14, 2017, 3:56 pm
Ken from Greenpoint says:
I'm so sorry about your loss May he rest in peace,
June 14, 2017, 4:22 pm
Henry Ford from Bay Ridge says:
Sorry reads. That could have been anyone on that bike, including me, but gothamist is about as credible as Streetsblog. Their agenda shines through, and that is fine, but they are making up their own facts as they go along. None of us know exactly what happened.
June 14, 2017, 5:53 pm
reads well from learning says:
Henry Ford from Bay Ridge,

From the NYPD CIS report:

"Surveillance footage shows the cyclist looking right as he is swerving left,"
June 15, 2017, 9:44 am
Henry Ford from Bay Ridge says:
Reads, if that's what on the surveillance tapes, then not charging the bus driver makes perfect sense. Its the same as looking in the passenger side mirror before changing into a left lane.
June 15, 2017, 1:50 pm
reads well from learning says:
the story has been updated, surveillance says otherwise:

http://gothamist.com/2017/06/15/citi_bike_video_hanegby.php

I get it, you have a hard on for cyclists but this time the motorist was at fault, and should be charged for not using caution while passing.
June 15, 2017, 9:28 pm

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