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Higher learning, lower maintenance: Students blast Brooklyn College for ramshackle campus

Broke it down: Brooklyn College students protest poor facility conditions, lack of funding, and a university system proposal to remove their control over student activity fees allocation at the campus on March 12.
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More like Brokelyn College!

Dozens of Brooklyn College students protested their campus’s abysmal conditions along with roughly 100 pupils from other schools in the City University of New York’s portfolio on March 12 at a rare open meeting of the school system’s board of trustees at the Flatbush campus.

“At Brooklyn College the infrastructure is crumbling,” said Corrinne Greene, a junior studying theater. “I can’t overemphasize that.”

The students complained that they are sick of the missing ceiling tiles, broken bathrooms, and lack of adequate funding at Brooklyn College. Faculty agreed, slamming Gov. Cuomo’s budget, saying it cut funds to city, further squeezing the university system.

“We’ve suffered badly from the withdrawal of state funding,” said Brooklyn College biology teacher Peter Lipke to the board at the hearing. “Our beautiful campus is crumbling.”

The clock tower in the center of campus has come to symbolize the school’s failing infrastructure.

“Our gorgeous clock tower,” said Greene, “The symbol of our school, recently stopped functioning.”

The students have started social-media campaigns to call attention to the dire conditions of the facilities, and the aptly named @cuny_brok­elyn_college Instagram account has more than 200 followers. There’s also a Facebook page called Fixing Brokelyn College.

The problems go beyond unabated asbestos, damaged walls, and out-of-order bathrooms, the students complain, extending to inadequate funding of the school’s programs. The music major who runs the Facebook page complains that many of the music professors are adjuncts only working part time, making it difficult to get help learning new pieces of music, for example.

“It’s ridiculous. I pay money to go this university, and they don’t have full-time staff, and I can’t go up to one of my teachers to ask for help,” said Allan Randall.

Construction of a new performing arts center has been pushed back many times over the past few years, according to Randall and Greene.

Students aren’t the only ones who lament conditions at the school. Brooklyn College itself admits the facilities are in need of a makeover.

“Most of the buildings at Brooklyn College are more than 50 years old, and are challenged by decades of deferred maintenance,” said a spokesman for the school.

The spokesman added that the school is working with the city and the state to make upgrades.

Greene said she believes Monday’s demonstration by students for across the city university system will make an impression on the board of trustees.

“I hope it’s a symbol to the board of trustees and shows we are mobilized together,” said Greene. “This has gone on way too long.”

Reach reporter Adam Lucente at alucente@cnglocal.com or by calling (718) 260–2511. Follow him on Twitter @Adam_Lucente.
Posted 12:00 am, March 14, 2018
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Reasonable discourse

Lois from Brooklyn says:
And this on the campus that was designated one of the most beautiful campuses in the U.S.!
March 14, 7:42 am
Tyler from pps says:
"pupils" is not a word used to refer to college student.

Also, the budget cuts by Gov. Cuomo are unconscionable. The CUNY system is a major economic engine of the state and is a significant way in which new yorkers lift themselves out of poverty.... However, Cuomo is starving the university (not only Brooklyn College).

The State legislature passed BI-PARTISAN funding bills to stave off some of these shortfalls (so-called "maintenance of effort" legislation). But guess who vetoed the bill?

Cuomo is a petty, petty man who values spite over serving the people.
March 14, 11:13 am
Tyler from pps says:
Currently, Morris, the responsible party and the one who should be blame is Gov. Cuomo.

The legislature, the taxpayers, the university administrators, the faculty union, the trades unions, the students, the parents, etc. etc. etc. are all calling for increased funding (or at the very least, no more cuts) for CUNY.

Cuomo is the only one on the wrong side of history here.

Oh, but he trotted out the "Excelsior Scholarship" that will help a tiny number of New York students to attend college... at crumbling institutions with dwindling staffing levels as enrollment goes up!
March 15, 11:36 am
Gargoyle from NfewKirk Plaza says:
And the college lacks "presence" or "moment"
either in its immediate community (which is also ramshackle) or in adjacent ones.
March 15, 1:39 pm
Rebecca from Midwood says:
Are these whiners the same snowflakes who hate NYPD to the point of trying to forbid officers from setting foot on campus?
March 16, 3:16 am

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